If you don't wear face makeup and you like that just fine, don't try to fix a good thing.

If you like a little coverage when you're having a breakout, have wanted to start wearing something but don't know where to start, or enjoy putting together a face of art every morning, then keep reading.

The cornerstone to any routine is a base. The problem is foundation is not good for our skin. It's a coating of stuff, primarily pigment, sitting in your pores for hours and trapping dead skin cells. And most of us don't really wash it all off at the end of the day, resulting in worse skin than when we first shellacked a coat of paint on to perfect it. Less product means better skin.

Want a fresh, even-toned face in less than five minutes? Pick your fit from my tried-and-true favorites below, and use a small, firm-yet-fluffy brush to buff out the product wherever you need it. I dip this PRO Airbrush Concealer Brush #57 from Sephora and apply it in small, circular movements around my undereye area, the base of my nose, and any spots around my chin and forehead. Done.

Your unmasked skin will thank you, and you just gave yourself time to press the snooze button again.

Two tones and two textures for any part of your skin, any season. (laura mercier)
Two tones and two textures for any part of your skin, any season. (laura mercier)

For A Perfect Shade Year-Round: Secret Camouflage by laura mercier

The trick to natural-looking coverage is an identical match to your skin tone. This is not possible with most product lines attempting to cover all ranges of skintone with a dozen shades. laura mercier found you a girl that does both. The oil-free, non-comedogenic, and dermatologist-tested formula has plenty of  the dual-toned pigment to cover spots, rosacea, or dark under eye areas in exactly the right shade.

The shades of Stretch Concealer. (Glossier)
The shades of Stretch Concealer. (Glossier)

For Barely There Coverage With a Fingertip: Stretch Concealer by Glossier

This buzz-brand has a lot more hype than bite, but one product they did pull off is the ultimate dewy concealer for the no-makeup look. The creamy formula has light, subtle coverage that is easy to pat on with a finger tip if you're in a rush or out and about. As the moisturizing texture can stay a bit sticky for a bit, definitely set your under eye area with a translucent powder to avoid mascara smudging below.

NARS Creamy Radiance Concealer in Custard, a yellow tone for light to medium complexion. (NARS)
NARS Creamy Radiance Concealer in Custard, a yellow tone for light to medium complexion. (NARS)

For Effortless Full Coverage: NARS Radiant Creamy Concealer

This is the closest thing to foundation without actually having to cover your whole face. I keep one of these opaque formulas around for days when the undereye bags are real, or I've got an angry, red pimple to deal with. The thicker consistency has moisturizing ingredients that soothe the irritated areas around breakouts and can help them heal faster. Many grab a couple of the twenty-two shades to have this secret weapon at the ready every season.

(use promo code NARSISSIST for bonus gift with orders $50+)

Un Cover-Up in 66, a deep warm amber. (RMS Beauty)
Un Cover-Up in 66, a deep warm amber. (RMS Beauty)

For a Matte, Natural Finish: Un Cover-Up by RMS Beauty

With a less oily texture that provides significant coverage without looking cakey, this is my current go-to every morning. The consistency is more solid than cream, but a few minutes after you've blended product around your areas of concern, you'll notice it warms to skin's temperature and melts into skin for that blurred, kind of airbrushed finish. It doesn't 100% cover blemishes as well as the NARS does, but it looks less made-up and lasts longer than the Glossier stretch formula.

The lighter shades of Un Cover-Up. (RMS Beauty)
The lighter shades of Un Cover-Up. (RMS Beauty)

(Cool Stuff is a new feature at Willamette Week where we feature product reviews, roundups, sales and other commerce and shopping-oriented content. All Cool Stuff reviews are editorially independent, meaning we provide honest reviews and aren't paid by the brands we write about. If you do choose to purchase something after following one of our links, Willamette Week may receive a commission, which helps fund our journalism.)