Reference ID: 06BRASILIA993

Created: 2006-05-22 17:22

Released: 2011-08-30 01:44

Classification: UNCLASSIFIED//FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY

Origin: Embassy Brasilia


VZCZCXRO3178

RR RUEHRG

DE RUEHBR #0993 1421722

ZNR UUUUU ZZH

R 221722Z MAY 06

FM AMEMBASSY BRASILIA

TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC 5439

INFO RUEHSO/AMCONSUL SAO PAULO 6994

RUEHRG/AMCONSUL RECIFE 4804

RUEHRI/AMCONSUL RIO DE JANEIRO 2107

RUEHAC/AMEMBASSY ASUNCION 5436

RUEHBU/AMEMBASSY BUENOS AIRES 4021

RUEHLP/AMEMBASSY LA PAZ 4591

RUEHMN/AMEMBASSY MONTEVIDEO 6251

RUEHSG/AMEMBASSY SANTIAGO 5509

RUCPDO/USDOC WASHDC


UNCLAS BRASILIA 000993


SIPDIS


DEPT FOR EB/IPE SWILSON, AMADAMO AND WHA/BSC

DEPT PLEASE PASS TO USTR MSULLIVAN, VESPINEL

DEPT PLEASE PASS TO USPTO FOR JURBAN

USDOC FOR 3134/USFCS/OIO/WH/SHUPKA

USDOC FOR 4332/ITA/MAC/WH/OLAC/MWARD

AID/W FOR LAC/AA


SENSITIVE

SIPDIS


E.O. 12958: N/A

TAGS: KIPR ETRD ECON BR

SUBJECT: DESPITE RECENT RAIDS, BRASILIA'S PIRATE GOODS MARKETPLACE STILL THRIVES


1. (U) Summary. According to an article published in the May 11 "Correio Brazilense," more than 150,000 products, mostly pirated DVDs and CDs, were apprehended in raids at Brasilia's Feira dos Importados (i.e., the "Import Fair"). The operation mobilized 120 police officers and closed down 95 retail outlets. Despite the raid, a week later the market appeared to be functioning normally with widespread sale of pirated goods. End Summary.


2. (U) On May 17 Econoff and Econ Assistant visited Brasilia's notorious pirate marketplace - the Feira dos Importados (i.e., the "Import Fair") - to determine whether after recent Federal Police raids pirated goods were still being sold there. At the main entrance to the market, hundreds of pirated DVDs were on display in make-shift stalls. Inside, all permanent stalls were open for business, most with obviously counterfeit products.


3. (U) The offering of pirated DVDS included movies currently showing in Brasilia cinemas, such as "Capote," and the "Da Vinci Code" was being advertised as available the following week. The quality of the "Capote" DVD was good, but was obviously a fake given its photocopy cover and low price of 5 reais (about US$2.40). Pirated Nike athletic shoes were on sale for 50% below the price of a genuine pair. Low-priced Disney logo toys were also for sale with tags indicating they were imported through a company in Ciudad del Este, Paraguay. One store offered pirate Microsoft Corel Draw CDs for R$5; legitimate copies are priced at hundreds of reais. A number of stores also sold "unblocked" Sony PlayStations capable of running pirated DVD games. If you already had a genuine PlayStation, the price to unblock it was R$200.


4. (U) Notwithstanding the presence of private security guards (but not police) ostensibly performing "inspections" at the fair, it was clear that vendors were openly selling pirated goods. While the GOB's recent raids may have taken a dent out of the piracy trade, it is clear that the government failed to stop the sale of illegitimate products at the Import Fair.


Chicola