We asked Hilary Berg, editor of Oregon Wine Press, and Brian Yaeger, author of Red, White and Brew: An American Beer Odyssey and the forthcoming Oregon Breweries, how they know they're getting good or bad drink service.


I know it's a good list when…

Hilary Berg: Wines, wineries and regions are spelled correctly—the curse of being an editor. Also, the list needs to have a variety of wines (pinot noir, chardonnay, etc.) in different styles (still, sparkling, dessert) and at different price points.

Brian Yaeger: It features predominantly craft beers from local or imported breweries and contains a wide variety of styles. Even if it's a short list, variety is the focal point.


Temperature-wise, I expect...

HB:

BY: I expect draft pours to be chilled but not cold, same for bottles. Frosted glasses offend my sensibilities.


Waiters should always...

HB:

BY: Know what is available on tap by brewery, name and style. Be willing to provide a sample when asked. Always provide a glass for bottled beer. If they're equipped to make pairing suggestions for specific dishes, so much the better, but don't recommend the IPA just because.


Waiters should never...

HB: Over-pour—a smaller amount allows the wine to breathe and gives you the opportunity to swirl and sniff.

BY: Answer the question "What beers do you have?" by replying, "All of 'em: Bud, Coors Light, Heineken, PBR and Heferwyzen."


Restaurants should always...

HB: Advocate their local wine industry, especially if the establishment claims to be "locavore." Also, restaurants should rotate selections—producers and varieties—on their glass pour lists.

BY: Carry several locally brewed options—which is the case in Portland 99 percent of the time.


Restaurants should never...

HB: Make the wine list an afterthought. Wine and food are meant to be enjoyed together.

BY: Let their draft lines go three weeks without being properly cleaned! They're not cast-iron pans that get better through seasoning.