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November 12th, 2008 BEN WATERHOUSE | Headout
 

Tired Of Turkey?

Order yourself an alternabird this Thanksgiving.

     
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GOOSE


$4.99 per pound at New Seasons Market. Order online at newseasonsmarket.com.
PRO: Fattier than turkey and slightly darker, goose is European decadence to turkey’s New England austerity.
CON: It still takes almost three hours to cook.
LEFTOVER POTENTIAL: Anything you can do with turkey, you can do with goose. Just use a little less of it.

OSTRICH


$26 per pound at exoticmeats.com.
PRO: Don’t like poultry? These terrifying dino-birds actually produce red meat similar in flavor to very lean beef.
CON: $26 per pound!?
LEFTOVER POTENTIAL: See “con.”

SQUAB


$10.99 per pound at Nicky USA, 234-4263 at nickyusa.com.
PRO: Each guest gets one of these delicious, 15-ounce domestic pigeons; crushing tiny bones makes you feel manly.
CON: You have to buy 24 of them.
LEFTOVER POTENTIAL: Unless you can seat two-dozen guests, you’ll be eating squab for weeks. There are worse fates. Roast them with rosemary.

DUCK


$3.99 per pound at New Seasons Market. Order online at newseasonsmarket.com.
PRO: Duck meat is rich and takes well to heavy sauces. Pair it with pears or apples and you’ll have a hell of a meal.
CON: Ducks aren’t that big, and become quite tough when overcooked.
LEFTOVER POTENTIAL: You’re unlikely to have much meat left on a 5-pound duck, but the carcass will make the best stock you’ve ever tasted.

“CELEBRATION ROAST”


$9.99 per pound at Whole Foods, 1210 NW Couch St., 525-4343 and other locations.
PRO: These oblong, “grain-meat” roasts, stuffed with apples, butternut squash, mushrooms and garlic, are vegan but actually taste like real food.
CON: It still doesn’t taste like meat.
LEFTOVER POTENTIAL: At 2 pounds per roast, you’re unlikely to have any.

Headout Picks

WEDNESDAY NOV. 12


[DANCE] KIDD PIVOT
White Bird’s flyin’ the coop for an athletic work from Canada’s Crystal Pite. Kaul Auditorium, Reed College, 3203 SE Woodstock Blvd., 790-2787. 8 pm Wednesday-Saturday, Nov. 12-15. $16-$26.

[MUSIC] GANG GANG DANCE, MARNIE STERN
Marnie Stern is the best guitar player you’ve never heard of, shredding like Eddie Van Halen one minute and writing a delicate, arty rock song the next. Berbati’s Pan, 231 SW Ankeny St., 248-4579. 9 pm. $12 advance, $15 day of show. 21+.

FRIDAY NOV. 14


[SCREEN] SYNECDOCHE, NY
Charlie Kaufman directs a movie about Philip Seymour Hoffman directing a play about himself directing a play about himself directing a play. And so on. Regal Fox Tower Stadium 10, 846 SW Park Avenue, 221-3280. See Movietimes for showings. $7.50-$10.50.

[WORDS] MORTIFIED PDX ONE-YEAR ANNIVERSARY
Your fellow Portlanders get up and read embarrassing journal entries for your enjoyment. Someday Lounge, 125 NW 5th Ave., 248-1030. 8 pm Friday-Saturday Nov. 14-15; 7 pm Sunday Nov. 16. $10 advance/$12 at the door. Tickets at getmortified.com/live.

SATURDAY NOV. 15


[FASHION] JUNK TO FUNK
This recycled fashion bash turns trash into runway gold, plus it’s presided over by Mayor-elect Sam Adams. Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell St., 284-8686. 8 pm. $16 advance, $20 door. Visit junktofunk.org for details.

[SCREEN] WENDY AND LUCY
The Northwest Film & Video Festival gets dibs on the Portland debut of Kelly Reichardt’s Cannes-buzzed film about Michelle Williams losing her dog outside the Lombard Street Walgreens. Whitsell Auditorium, Portland Art Museum, 1219 SW Park Avenue, 221-1156. 8 pm. $5-$8.

SUNDAY NOV. 16


[MUSIC] NICK JAINA BAND, TU FAWNING, BLIND PILOT
Three of Stumptown’s finest celebrate the release of Jaina’s A Narrow Way, one of the finest folk-rock records of the year. Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside St., 231-9663. 9 pm. $10. 21+.

TUESDAY NOV. 18


[MUSIC] CLASSICAL REVOLUTION
The mostly twentysomething players take on a teenage classic—Felix Mendelssohn’s astonishing octet, written when the composer was 16. Someday Lounge, 125 NW 5th Ave., 248-1030. 9 pm. $3.
 
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