The Oregonian's
O
Oregonian
Looper and an
Oregonian
ad rep then wrangled over the ad copy in an email exchange.
"On the front page, where it states Before It Changed Publishers, it should be corrected to read Before its editorial opposing Measure 66 & 67, The Oregonian ...." the ad rep requested.



"On the back page, the copy block with the headline of Then Why Is The Oregonian Ignoring Its Own Reporting? needs to be reconstructed or replaced. completely eliminated as this is false and misleading. The publisher was not involved. We decline to accept the personal reference to the publisher. With respect to your view that we are rejecting your claims about the errors in the opponents' ads, please be assured that we are not asking you to change any of that copy."
Oregonian
Oregonian
The Oregonian's
Looper pushed back in an email:
I find it incomprehensible that the Oregonian could maintain that we are being in any way misleading to question the role of your publisher in promoting the NO campaign position on measures 66 & 67. As a veteran of many political campaigns, I'm familiar with having to answer uncomfortable questions from newspapers. I am, however, wholly unfamiliar with newspapers trying to avoid having uncomfortable questions asked of them.
USA Today
N. Christian Anderson III, publisher and CEO of the Orange County Register, says his paper intends to keep its front page reserved for news in spite of the attraction of added revenue. The decision will be weighed carefully by publishers market by market to see if the promise is worth the risk of alienating readers, he says.



"For a USA Today reader, these ads won't be a big deal," says Anderson, president of the American Society of Newspaper Editors. "They might even expect to see them. They also see big dollar signs." But, he adds, "We think we know what our readers want. I don't think they want ads on the front page."