March 28th, 2012 | by WW Culture Staff Food & Drink |

Newer Old Lompoc: NW 23rd Ave. Brewery and Pub Finds Home in New Building

Beloved local bar finds space in new building, will reopen in 2013.

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New Old Lompoc has signed a lease in the building replacing its current home.

One of the last great, gritty bars on NW 23rd Ave., Lompoc will close on April 28. Lompoc will then be smashed to bits so a complex of swishy LEED-certified apartments can be built where the brewpub's yellow walls and mossy roof now (somehow) stand.

The buildings next to it have already been turned into a giant hole. Now, Lompoc owner Jerry Fechter says he will reopen (Newer Old Lompoc is our suggested name) in summer 2013.

“We shall return!” exclaimed Fechter. “The pub will be built in the exact same location on the block, only in the new building that is to replace our beloved pub... We love this old building and all the character it has, but the time has come to upgrade. With the new pub, we will strive to create that great neighborhood pub vibe that we’ve been known for all these years.” 

The developer will begin erecting a four-story mixed-use building on the block in May. When finished, there will be retail on the first floor, 24 apartment units above, and a "state-of-the-art mechanized parking system."

There will not, however, be a brewery. Lompoc is moving its brewing operation to the Lompoc Brewery at 3901 N. Williams Ave. Lompoc will also lose its beloved back patio. The pain will be soothed by a large outdoor patio in the front of the building, a portion of which will covered and heated.

Originally known as the Old Lompoc Brewery, the space has been a tavern since 1993. The brewing operation began in December 1996. The New Old Lompoc opened in 2000, co-owned by Fechter and iconic local publican Don Younger of the Horse Brass.

The old location's last day, April 28, is being billed as Lompocalypse and you will find many WW staffers there.

 
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