August 2nd, 2013 | by WW Culture Staff Features | Posted In: Willamette Weekend

Willamette Weekend: 12 Things to Do in Portland, August 2-4

clublist_3938(meadows)PORTLAND MEADOWS - IMAGE: Evan Johnson
Friday, August 2

Batman ’66 No. 1 Release Party
[COMICS] Harking back to the golden age of Batman when it was just Adam West in spandex, Batman ’66 No. 1, released by DC Comics, finds the Caped Crusader and his Boy Wonder attempting to thwart the Riddler in a fine-art heist. Will a certain feline femme fatale step in to help or hinder their mission? Creators Jeff Parker, Jonathan Case and Mike Allred will be on hand to sign copies, and devoted Batman cosplayer Allan Quick will be available for photos. Get ready to do the Batusi. Bridge City Comics, 3725 N Mississippi Ave., 282-5484. 6 pm. Free.

Opera in the Park: Otello
[OPERA] In case you thought Trek in the Park was the only “in the park” game in town, here comes Portland Summerfest to prove the quill is mightier than the phaser. This production of Verdi’s opera (based on Shakespeare’s Othello) includes a full orchestra and narration—quite a bit more production value than a captain’s seat and a keyboard player. Here’s a chance to prove to your date you like to throw down highbrow style between seasons of Game of Thrones. And the bonus is that during the performance you can legally consume your own alcohol in the park. NATHAN CARSON. Washington Park Rose Garden Amphitheater, 400 SW Kingston Ave., 823-3636. 6 pm Friday, Aug. 2. Free. All ages.

Sebadoh, Octa#grape
[MUSIC] Though it has been 14 years since Sebadoh last let loose any music into the world, time hasn’t dimmed the band’s poignant and driving attack. If anything, the emotions on the trio’s upcoming new album, Defend Yourself, are even more deeply felt, as co-leader Lou Barlow’s songs detail his recent divorce. There’s also the added punch of the work its members have been doing outside the Sebadoh fold. Barlow has been busy playing with a reunited and reinvigorated Dinosaur Jr., while fellow vocalist-guitarist-bassist Jason Loewenstein logged time as a touring member of Fiery Furnaces. And anyway, seeing the band in such a small venue will surely prove a rare, ear-ringing delight. ROBERT HAM. Bunk Bar, 1028 SE Water Ave., 894-9708. 9 pm. $15. 21+.

50: A Possible History of Dance Music, 1963-2013: Cooky Parker, Nathan Detroit, Freaky Outy
[MUSIC] It’s an homage to our beat-bumping elders, a five-decade-spanning dance party and a highly anthropological study of the boogie. DJs Cooky Parker, Nathan Detroit and Freaky Outy will spin a selection Dead drummer Mickey Hart gets points for trying something different. Sometimes it works, especially when the master fires forth with polyrhythmic drum compositions that speak to the primal. Other times, it’s just goddamn weird, as when Hart decided to use as his inspiration ancient cosmic noises culled by NASA, and emerged with a post-Enya New Age record. His upcoming Superorganism could go either way, but for Dead fans looking for something other than another reprise of “Sugar Magnolia,” Hart’s experiments, for good or ill, are a breath of fresh cosmic air. AP KRYZA. Roseland Theater, 8 NW 6th Ave., 224-2038. 8 pm. $25. 21+. Through Aug. 3.

Pickathon
[MUSIC] Although much of the actual “picking” is now overshadowed by big-name indie buzz acts— this year’s includes Kurt Vile, Divine Fits and headliner Feist—Pickathon has evolved into one of the most uniquely eclectic music festivals in the country, with opportunities to discover your new favorite artist happening at any given moment. Pendarvis Farm, 16581 SE Hagen Road, Happy Valley. $160 individual days, $260 weekend admission. All ages. See pickathon.com for schedule.

Saturday, August 3

Trek in the Park
[THEATER]This is the final frontier for Trek in the Park, which for the past half-decade has staged Star Trek episodes with live actors. This summer’s episode, “The Trouble With Tribbles,” finds the Enterprise overflowing with Furbies. Cathedral Park, North Edison Street and Pittsburg Avenue. 5 pm Saturdays- Sundays through Aug. 25. Free.

Drive-In at Zidell Yards
[MOVIES] Forget about driving to Newberg or Hood River for your old-timey moviegoing experience: The NW Film Center is bringing the drive-in to you. For three days, catch screenings of four classic movies—Singin’ in the Rain, Dazed and Confused, Jaws and Blue Velvet—underneath the Ross Island Bridge. Pack breath mints (nudge, nudge). Zidell Yards, 3030 SW Moody Ave., 221-1156. Dusk. $8-$12. See nwfilm.org for schedule. Through Aug. 5.

The Lord Weird Slough Feg, Grayceon, Lesbian, Eight Bells, Krystos
[MUSIC] The Richard Powers-meets-Frank Frazetta, Heavy Metal-esque artwork that accompanies the latest single by Slough Feg should say everything necessary regarding what this San Francisco-based metal band is all about. Well, that and the title of the A-side track: “Laser Enforcer.” The song itself is what headbangers have come to expect from this 20-plus-year-old outfit: a chugging rhythm augmented by lazer-fire sound effects and leader Michael Scalzi’s lyrical tales of down-and-dirty space exploration. Joining Slough Feg is a murderers’ row of West Coast metal talent, including Boise, Idaho, thrashers Krystos and local prog-sludge trio Eight Bells. ROBERT HAM. Ash Street Saloon, 225 SW Ash St., 226- 0430. 9 pm. $10. 21+.

Sunday, August 4

Trombone Shorty, JJ Grey, Mofro
[MUSIC] At the ripe old age of 27, Troy “Trombone Shorty” Andrews is on the fast track toward taking up Louis Armstrong’s mantle of New Orleans performers who transcend racial and cultural boundaries. The child trumpet-trombone prodig now has his own charitable foundation and an after-school program, plus a children’s book in the works. Forthcoming Verve Records release Say That to Say This has him transitioning from producer Ben Ellman to throwback R&B soulman Raphael Saadiq, and performing a powerhouse collab with NOLA funk legends the Meters and Cyril Neville. Backed by other talented local players, the Orleans Avenue live show is an experience, invigorated by call-and-response musicianship, tight grooves and face-melting horn work. AMANDA SCHURR. Oregon Zoo, 4001 SW Canyon Road, 220-2789. 7 pm. $26-$46. All ages.

No Name #1: A Celebration of the Life and Music of Elliott Smith
[MUSIC] If you haven’t lived in Portland long, conveying what Elliott Smith meant to this town won’t possibly fit in this tiny space. So let’s keep this simple: On Aug. 6, Smith would’ve been 44 years old. To commemorate the life he managed to live, the Friends and Family of Elliott Smith have scheduled four charity benefit concerts this month in four cities, the first of which, appropriately, is taking place at Doug Fir. Gus Van Sant will host. The announced performers include Jason Lytle of Grandaddy, singer-songwriter David Garza, frequent Smith collaborators Scott McPherson and Shon Sullivan, and the Geodes, featuring Larry Crane, Paul Pulverenti, Paul Brainard and Jolie Holland, among several others. If you are, indeed, unaware of Smith’s still-reverberating connection to Portland, this show will probably tell you much more than I could possibly write. Doug Fir Lounge, 830 E Burnside St., 231-9663. 8 pm. $30 advance, $35 day of show. 21+.

Sassy’s Car and Dog Wash
[STRIPPERS] Strippers at the heavily tattooed inner-Southeast club scrub cars and pooches to benefit the Oregon Humane Society. Why not support a good cause for once in your wretched life? 11 am-6 pm. 927 SE Morrison St., 231-1606, sassysbar.com. Tip like you’re sitting at the rail.

Kristen Miller: Passing Through
[ART] Kristen Miller is nothing less than a mixed-media poet. Using fabric, thread, beads and paper, she creates magnificently simple works that breathe in light and exhale visual harmony. Adjectives are inadequate to describe these pieces: immaculate, impeccable, perfected, insouciant. For artworks so quiet to pack such an aggregate punch is a small miracle. Through Aug. 31. PDX Contemporary Art, 925 NW Flanders St., 222-0063.
 
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