Big Bottom Whiskey

21420 NW Nicholas Court, Suites D-8 and D-9, Hillsboro, 608-7816, bigbottomwhiskey.com.

They don't get much foot traffic at Big Bottom, which sits in an industrial park just west of the Tanasbourne big-box shopping village. Other than a few curious people who wander in after tipping brews next door at Vertigo Brewing, anyone who shows up at the tasting room, which is shared with Tualatin Valley Distilling, wants to try Ted Pappas' expanding line of bourbons, which are finished in a variety of casks, from port to zinfandel. Pappas, president of the Oregon Distillers Guild, began his company in 2010 by aging and blending whiskeys from other producers, but began distilling his own spirits back in September, with plans to replace Big Bottom with a label called Barlow Trail and to add his own rum, brandy and gin. At least for now, the distiller's plan is to produce a rye in two years. MARTIN CIZMAR.

Tastings & Tours: Tastings are free noon-4 pm Saturday, or by appointment, in the tasting room they share with Tualatin Valley Distilling.

Drink this: Port cask-finished American whiskey ($38).

Bull Run Distilling Co.

2259 NW Quimby St., 224-3483, bullrundistillery.com.

Lee Medoff and Patrick Bernards' 4-year-old Bull Run distillery has a 6-year-old whiskey. This is mildly mysterious until you realize that Bull Run was in the works long before they opened their doors. The first batches of whiskey were distilled back East, according to their recipe; the first house-distilled batch will be ready in two years. Both the straight bourbon and American Temperance Trader whiskeys sweetly carry hints of vanilla and toffee, though the 110-proof barrel-strength will set you down on your ass. Meanwhile, their winter seasonal chinato barrel-finished whiskey is interestingly herbal, and comparatively gentle. But though whiskey is often the holy grail of craft distillers—in part because Americans drink so much of it—Bull Run's signal achievements are really the rum and the vodka. The vodka is lightly distilled in the Eastern European style, with less coconut than most American vodkas; one tastes instead a sort of rocky, grainy character amid the sweetness. Meanwhile, the rum is a marvel, a complexly malty white that's just a bit gold from the four weeks it spends in bourbon barrels. Aria Gin—Portland's best traditional London-dry—is also made here, although it will soon move around the corner to 2304 NW Savier St. MATTHEW KORFHAGE.

Tastings & Tours: From noon-6 pm Wednesday-Sunday, $5 nets a full tasting of the distillery's spirits. Tours on request.

Drink this: Pacific rum ($25).

Bull Run Distilling Co. (Thomas Teal)
Bull Run Distilling Co. (Thomas Teal)

Clear Creek Distillery

2389 NW Wilson St., 248-9470, clearcreekdistillery.com.

Steve McCarthy is the resident elder among Portland's craft distillers. He founded Clear Creek in 1985, at first focusing on brandy made from Bartlett pears grown on the family's orchard in the Hood River Valley. That brandy is as aromatic, intense and three-dimensional as ever. McCarthy is evangelistic about the proper way to drink his products (namely, never ever mixed in cocktails). In the past 30 years, his offerings have swelled to include a half-dozen other fruit brandies, several grappas, some lip-smackingly fruity liqueurs (the cranberry is like liquefied Thanksgiving), oak-aged brandy and a very peaty three year, single-malt whiskey made with barley from Scotland. Hood River Distillers bought Clear Creek earlier this year, but McCarthy has stayed on as adviser, and others at Clear Creek assure us little will change. Tastings take place in the distillery's low-slung warehouse in industrial Northwest Portland, a brightly lit, no-frills space somehow evocative of a classroom, were it not for the bottles of alcohol lining the shelves. Friendly employees pour samples and speak in lofty terms about the liquor: Of the grappas, we were told the pinot grigio was like wet grass; the sangiovese like a wet cemetery; and the nebbiolo like a hay barn, sans fecal material. And they mandate that you save the Douglas fir eau de vie for last—its woodsy, herbal notes linger for a long while, like very pleasant mouthwash. Indeed, we left the distillery with a directive generally heard only at the dentist: "Don't put anything else in your mouth for 30 minutes!" REBECCA JACOBSON.

Tastings & Tours: $5 for five samples. Tasting room open 10 am-6 pm Monday-Saturday; closed 1-2 pm on weekdays. No public tours of the distillery.

Drink this: If you've never tried it, the pear brandy ($28 for 375 ml). Otherwise, the mirabelle brandy ($30 for 375 ml), a peppery and potent eau de vie made from yellow plums.

Cornelius Pass Roadhouse Distillery

4045 NW Cornelius Pass Road, Hillsboro, 640-6174, mcmenamins.com.

There are a few tricks to distilling in century-old copper. When McMenamins installed an old French cognac still in the oldest agricultural building in Washington County on the wooded grounds of this former farmstead, they knew they needed some help running it. So they hired a consultant: Hubert, a 70-something French immigrant who apprenticed in cognac and who taught distiller Bart Hance tricks like using wax, twine and an old soup can in place of a thermometer. When the pipes are heated to the right temperature for the next step in the process, the wax melts and the can drops to the floor. The still—which was installed using bricks reclaimed from the Kennedy School boiler room and now has clean, predictable natural gas instead of an open wood flame—mostly produces wheat whiskey and brandy, though there are also barrels of rum in the old warehouse and a new hazelnut liqueur due on shelves this month. The Billy whiskey, a sweet wheat drop that pays homage to the distillery house's former life as a wheat storehouse, is Hance's personal favorite. MARTIN CIZMAR.

Tastings & Tours: Just call and ask; they'll let you know when the distiller is available to chat. Tastes are available for $2 at many McMenamins locations.

Drink this:Billy, a young, sweet wheat whiskey ($35).

Cournelius Pass Roadhouse (Daniel Cole)
Cournelius Pass Roadhouse (Daniel Cole)

Dogwood Distilling

1835 19th Ave., Forest Grove, 359-7705, dogwooddistilling.com.

Not many distilleries would brag about producing the well vodka at several notable Portland restaurants, but Dogwood has carved out a niche with its DL Franklin Vodka ($15.95). The 100 percent corn vodka is made with local ingredients, and there's a good chance you've already tasted this "just-below-midshelf" spirit at Kachka, Old Salt, Imperial or Ox. Distiller Matt Hottenroth and co-owner Jasin Hope founded Dogwood with an eye toward making straightforward, reliable midshelf liquor at a price reasonable enough that bars could stock it as a well. Hottenroth sums up the distillery's ethos while describing its Union Gin on the website: "I wanted the alcohol that sat behind my grandpa's bar, that could make a martini, a gin and tonic, or a gin rickey perfectly. It's a same-every-batch kind of product; you know exactly what you're getting." No frills, nothing too artisanal, just some liquor you can rely on. JOHN LOCANTHI.

Tastings & Tours: There is no official tasting room per se but Hottenroth and Hope are "always willing to show off our solace."

Drink this: Added to the lineup in 2012, Union Gin ($22) is a smooth, clean gin that will feel at home with any classic cocktail.

Eastside Distilling

1512 SE 7th Ave., 926-7060, eastsidedistilling.com.

Controversy surrounds Eastside Distilling's flagship product. Though it's called Burnside Bourbon, no one's quite sure where the four-year, barrel-aged whiskey actually originates. When pressed by local media a few years back, owner Lenny Gotter deflected, and when asked at a recent tasting how much distilling the 5-year-old company does itself, the congenial server replied, "All of it." Gotter wrote us that the company blends its whiskey from multiple sources, and the imbiber will likely be satisfied to find a solid, spicy 96-proof bourbon. Besides, there are a dozen other distinctive liquors where that came from, wherever that happens to be. Tiered tastings are available at Eastside's gift-shoplike headquarters along Distillery Row. Skip the holiday liqueurs and go for the premium tasting, which includes the bourbon and its Oregon Oaked cousin, which spends 60 extra days in a charred oak barrel, bringing out slight hints of maple. (According to our server, the hefty price tag—almost double that of the regular bourbon—is due to the rarity of charred Oregon oak barrels.) Other Eastside staples include the Portland Potato Vodka, made from actual spuds instead of grains, and a series of spiced rums, highlighted by the summery ginger variety. Its most unique offerings are the fruit-infused whiskeys, one with marionberry and another with cherry, which look a little like NyQuil but make for a tasty post-meal pseudo-digestif. MATTHEW SINGER.

Tastings & Tours: Noon-8 pm Sunday-Thursday, noon-10 pm Friday-Saturday. $5-$10 for six to nine samples. Weekend tours by appointment. Note that Eastside is in the process of moving to their new, expanded location at 1805 SE Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. Both locations are now open.

Drink this: The Below Deck Ginger Rum ($20), which is mild and citrusy enough to mix with soda and cider alike.

Edgefield Distillery

2126 SW Halsey St., Troutdale, 800-669-8610, mcmenamins.com.

Situated between Troutdale's outlet malls and the proposed Wood Village casino site, Edgefield is the oldest of McMenamins' two distilleries. In a recent side-by-side tasting of whiskeys, the Edgefield distiller betrayed a little bit of friendly rivalry, touting the greater complexity of the four-year Hogshead over that of the younger Billy from McMenamins' Cornelius Pass. But while whiskey accounts for 95 percent of sales these days, the little distillery in the dry storage shed of an old poor farm began 16 years ago by making brandy distilled from Edgefield's own wine. The 11-year pot-still brandy is lovely, smooth, rich and complex—an oaky and floral mixture every bit as regionally determined as a French Armagnac or cognac. The Alambic 13 was made for them on an old-timey alembic still, then aged 13 years, and it's a revelation in vanilla. Just avoid the cloying Aval Pota, which blends cinnamon-infused White Owl whiskey with apple juice. If you want spice and sweetness, get instead the Three Rocks Rum, which stands out for its chocolate sweetness. The bar next to the wee distillery is cozy and smells thickly of a wood-burning stove, usually full of resort denizens just off of the Pub Course links. MATTHEW KORFHAGE.

Tastings & Tours: Whiskey flights are $15 and brandy flights are $14 at the distillery bar, open every day, or individual tasters can be had for $2 apiece. Tours are held at 2 pm daily, with an additional 4 pm tour on weekends.

Drink this: Get that transcendent Alambic 13-year brandy ($37) while it lasts.

Edgefield Distillery (Daniel Cole)
Edgefield Distillery (Daniel Cole)

Edgefield Distillery

2126 SW Halsey St., Troutdale, 800-669-8610, mcmenamins.com.

Situated between Troutdale's outlet malls and the proposed Wood Village casino site, Edgefield is the oldest of McMenamins' two distilleries. In a recent side-by-side tasting of whiskeys, the Edgefield distiller betrayed a little bit of friendly rivalry, touting the greater complexity of the four-year Hogshead over that of the younger Billy from McMenamins' Cornelius Pass. But while whiskey accounts for 95 percent of sales these days, the little distillery in the dry storage shed of an old poor farm began 16 years ago by making brandy distilled from Edgefield's own wine. The 11-year pot-still brandy is lovely, smooth, rich and complex—an oaky and floral mixture every bit as regionally determined as a French Armagnac or cognac. The Alambic 13 was made for them on an old-timey alembic still, then aged 13 years, and it's a revelation in vanilla. Just avoid the cloying Aval Pota, which blends cinnamon-infused White Owl whiskey with apple juice. If you want spice and sweetness, get instead the Three Rocks Rum, which stands out for its chocolate sweetness. The bar next to the wee distillery is cozy and smells thickly of a wood-burning stove, usually full of resort denizens just off of the Pub Course links. MATTHEW KORFHAGE.

Tastings & Tours: Whiskey flights are $15 and brandy flights are $14 at the distillery bar, open every day, or individual tasters can be had for $2 apiece. Tours are held at 2 pm daily, with an additional 4 pm tour on weekends.

Drink this: Get that transcendent Alambic 13-year brandy ($37) while it lasts.

Flooded Fox Den Distillery

2331 23rd Ave., Suite 103, Forest Grove, 308-9050, floodedfoxden.com.

Named for a Sisyphean fox that always returned to its frequently flooded den in the drainage system of distiller Scot Lester's first house in Portland, Flooded Fox Den Distillery is one of the newest additions to the Portland gin scene. "In fact," says Lester, who had just sent off his first batch of Dancing Dog Gin to the Oregon Liquor Control Commission a few hours before I

arrived at the distillery, "I would say it is the newest gin in the state." An engineer at Intel by day, Lester has been making booze as a hobby since his days as a penniless college student. Now he's gone pro. Dancing Dog is the only offering so far, but he expects his light rum to be available by January and a vodka made from store-bought grain alcohol to be on shelves by March. Lester also picked up two barrels with an eye toward aging a dark rum. You won't find Dancing Dog Gin on the shelves just yet, but it's available to order through your local liquor store. JOHN LOCANTHI.

Tastings & Tours: There isn't a tasting room yet, just a room in a warehouse with the still, the barrels and the colorful Southwestern decorations that messed up the feng shui of the Texas transplant's house.

Drink this: Dancing Dog Gin ($29) is a delightfully floral midshelf dry gin.

House Spirits

2025 SE 7th Ave.,235-3174, housespirits.com.

Christian Krogstad's House Spirits is a titan among Portland craft spirits—made famous by the lavender-forward Aviation Gin's wild nationwide success in establishing American dry gins as a style—but their tasting room has always been a remarkably humble affair. The cozy faux apothecary has a little bar where $5 will get you a tour through the familiar gin, along with their cleanly coconutty Volstead vodka, a smooth two-year Irish-American-style Westward whiskey, a cocktail-ready Krogstad Festlig Aquavit, and an aged sipping aquavit called Krogstad Gamle. Right now, you can get a Stumptown coffee liqueur—Krogstad and Stumptown founder Duane Sorenson used to be neighbors—a crisply sweet rum whose alcohol spike is nearly hidden by cold-brew coffee. But the tasting room won't stay humble for long—nor will the distillery. After a partial buyout by an investment group that included Joe Montana, House Spirits is now investing in nationwide distribution and a massive 14,000-square-foot brewery and tasting room at 68 SE Stark St., which was originally scheduled to open this November. It'll be the largest distillery in Portland—that is, unless Eastside opens its planned, even-larger Salmon Street distillery first. MATTHEW KORFHAGE.

Tastings & Tours: Tasting room open noon-5 pm Wednesday, Thursday and Sunday; noon-6 pm Friday-Saturday. $5 will get you the full tour de liquor, and free tours are offered at 1 and 3 pm Saturday.

Drink this: Even if the other spirits are familiar, stop in at the distillery to try their limited edition Stillhouse series, whether a coffee liqueur, a small-batch rum or a white dog whiskey.

Indio Spirits

7272 SW Durham Road, Suite 100, Tigard, 620-0313, indiospirits.com.

Distilling's "the easy part," says Indio's Mark White. The real art of it comes in after that: aging programs, blends, infusions and the like. Indio began as a distillery more than 10 years ago, but these days the focus is on their blends and infusions—and they've got two you'll have a hard time finding anywhere else. Their curaçao is made from Barbados rum, infused with blood oranges. It burns sweet and smells incredible. They've just released a hop liqueur, Hopka (get it?), which smells like a strong IPA and has a pungent taste. Fruit is added after distillation for maximum flavor, which might explain why their marionberry vodka tastes like actual marionberries and not like the cloying, nightmare booze sorority parties are made of. But Indio's not some one-trick infusion pony. They cleaned up at this year's distillers fest in Portland, winning double gold—the highest honor—for their Barrel Room Rum, a mixture of 4-, 5- and 8-year-old rums, a pleasant combination of dry and sweet. Located in an office park just south of Bridgeport Village, near the Tigard-Lake Oswego city limits, Indio's tasting room is likely to remind some eastsiders too much of their suburban upbringings to make the trip out. But that just means more space at the bar for you. JAMES HELMSWORTH.

Tastings & Tours: Tastings at 2 pm Friday-Saturday, 12-4 pm Sunday. Tours available by request.

Drink this: Snake River Stampede whiskey ($25), a blend of 4- and 8-year-old Albertan whiskeys, mixed with Bull Run water and aged in sherry barrels. It's smooth, creamy and just a little bit sweet, perfect for drinking straight.

Industrial Row Distillery 645 N Tillamook St., 893-4730, irdistillery.com.

All alone in the industrial district near Swan Island, Nelson D'Amour makes a creamy, unfiltered vodka of absolutely meticulous purity. The purity's important, because he eschews filtration to bring across the flavor of the Bob's Red Mill whole wheat and rye grains he brews himself. He likes to have control of the whole process, he says, so he can fine-tune the whole process of vodka creation rather than work with a brewery. The result, Dystopia Vodka, is one of the most distinctive in town, creamy and rich and nothing like vodkas that stake their claim on disappearing into cocktails. Still, it all takes time, and because he has a demanding day job as an engineer at Intel, he came up with an ingenious solution to monitor the distilling process from afar: He hooked up the copper still with a homemade setup of wires, gauges and gadgets that allow him to assess and modify the distilling process from his home computer, with a software program he also made himself. He plans to make both rum and gin, but says he'd have to get another still for gin. He doesn't want those gin botanicals messing with the vodka. MATTHEW KORFHAGE.

Tastings & Tours: The tasting room is slated to open by the end of November, 1-5 pm Saturdays.

Drink this: Dystopia Vodka ($31).

New Deal Distillery

900 SE Salmon St., 234-2513, newdealdistillery.com.

New Deal was founded the same year as House Spirits (2004), in the same neighborhood, and grew just as large in the minds of Portlanders. But distiller Tom Burkleaux's approach to gin couldn't be more different from House Spirits' botanical-floral route. New Deal takes an almost puritanical tack, teasing out complex flavors from only juniper, in their two flagship gins: Nos. 1 and 33. The No. 1 is honey-colored and picks up oils and tannins for a rich complexity, while the No. 33 is brilliantly citric dry gin without adding one iota of citrus. It's a bit of a magic trick. New Deal's No. 88 vodka seems custom-designed for the needs of bartenders; the eponymous 88 proof adds a little heat to amp up a cocktail. New Deal also makes what's probably the best coffee liquor in town: In addition to their cold-brew liqueur (Water Avenue, Clive Coffee), their Mud Puddle infuses vodka with house-roasted cacao nibs. Look out for JVR distillery's Krupnik at their tasting room; the honey-mead Lithuanian spirit is being distilled at New Deal, and it's a sweetly herbal treat. MATTHEW KORFHAGE.

Tastings & Tours: Tasting room open noon-5 pm Wednesday-Sunday. $5 nets a full tasting. Group tours available by appointment.

Drink this: The gin No. 33 ($25) is destined to become a classic among dry gins.

Rogue Distillery and Public House

1339 NW Flanders St., 222-5910, rogue.com.

Rogue has only one pot still in Portland. It is copper, handbuilt and produces just 2.5 gallons of liquor per batch. You will not try anything from it, even when you visit the tasting room just next door. That's because Danny Connors, head brewer at Buckman Botanical, uses it for his experimental creations—apple brandies, rum aged in pinot noir barrels, liquors distilled with herbs and spices—that at the moment only a select few get to try. The booze the rest of us can sample at Rogue's Pearl District sports bar shows a similar experimental spirit, with varying results. The spruce gin is a sort of kissing cousin to the juniper-forward liquor made famous by the English, though you couldn't exactly call it dry. The hazelnut spice rum, on the other hand, tastes like moldering gingerbread. Rogue started distilling in 2003 and has been making whiskey since 2006, but for now they're not aging it longer than eight months, which means both the Dead Guy and the single-malt are hot and sweet. And that's emblematic of the distillery—a lot of experimentation, even if not much of it matures. REBECCA JACOBSON.

Tastings & Tours: Free 20-minute tours are at 4 and 6 pm Monday-Friday. Small samples, available after the tour, are $1.

Drink this: The spruce gin ($39) is a nice change of direction from what's normally a juniper forward spirit.

Rolling River Spirits

1215 SE 8th Ave., Suite H, 236-3912, rollingriverspirits.com.

A distillery tasting room can often feel like the perfume counter at a department store, with a paid shill regurgitating advertising copy while mixing in enough improvised banter to make it seem like a genuine human interaction. At Rolling River, the experience is more like entering a stranger's living room and having them show off photos of their grandkids. A true mom-and-pop enterprise—or, rather, mom-pop-and-son—head distiller Tim Rickard graduated from homebrewing in 2011 and established Rolling River with his father, Rick, and mother, Joan. Even after moving up to Distillery Row this year, the company remains all in the family, and devoid of pretension: Pouring samples from behind the handsome curved wood bar in their small, open warehouse space, Joan talks up the liquors as if she's in her kitchen auditioning them for the neighbors. It's a charmingly homespun operation, but the products are elegant and sophisticated. There are only two being bottled at the moment—an impeccably smooth vodka, made in a still Tim Rickard hand-built himself, and a deliciously flowery gin. But whiskey, flavored rum and an aquavit are in the works. MATTHEW SINGER.

Tastings & Tours: 4:30-7 pm Friday, noon-5 pm Saturday-Sunday, weekdays by appointment. $5 for samples of the vodka and gin, plus a mini-cocktail and complimentary shot glass. A tour isn't necessary; you can view practically the whole operation from the tasting room.

Drink this: The remarkably sippable gin ($26.50), accented by hints of star anise and juniper.

Stone Barn Brandyworks

3315 SE 19th Ave., 775-6747, stonebarnbrandyworks.com.

Nestled between body shops and the Brooklyn Rail Yard just south of Southeast Powell Boulevard, Stone Barn Brandyworks looks more production warehouse than tasting room. Show up on one of the days they're not open to the public (call first) and you can watch them work while sipping up to 12 whiskeys and liqueurs made no more than 10 feet away. Co-owner wife-and-husband team Erika and Sebastian Degens—she's there full time, he's a dedicated empty-nester with a demanding day job—have been distilling at their location since 2009. Alongside assistant Andy Garrison, who started as an apprentice and became so skilled at making whiskey they had no choice but to hire him, they create sippable distillations for which mixers would be an insult. The tasting experience showcases a friendly Erika pouring drinks in batches, starting with whiskeys, then the fruit liqueurs, followed by Eastside Ouzo, pinot noir grappa and cold brew-infused liqueur, all presented in a plethora of short and tall shot glasses and a tiny, tiny mug. Their fruits are sourced from Southern Oregon and the Willamette Valley, the whiskey ingredients from Bob's Red Mill, and the ouzo and grappa from Hip Chicks Do Wine's grape pomace, and their cold-brew from Marigold Coffee a few streets away. TYLER HURST.

Tastings & Tours: Noon-6 pm Monday, Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday. For groups larger than five all other days, call 341-2227 to make arrangements. Flights are $5 for five tastes of your choice, though if you want to sample all 12, being nice may get you a $2 discount.

Drink this: Red Wing Roast Coffee Liqueur, infused with cold-brew Yemeni and El Salvadorian Marigold Coffee to make it the best version of cold Irish coffee you've probably never had. Also get the lightly syrupy—almost juicy—Biggs Junction Apricot Liqueur, made with Yakima Valley apricots. Both are available in 375 ml bottles for $25 each.

Tualatin Valley Distilling

21420 NW Nicholas Court, Suites D-8 and D-9, Hillsboro, 949-212-6900, tvdistilling.com.

Jason O'Donnell has a very messy desk: paperwork, Jack in the Box wrappers and a gallon jug of uncut 160-proof rum. It's all part of doing business when he's in the middle of harvest season, distilling fresh fruit into seasonal brandies to go with his line of American whiskeys, which are aged for a few months in small oak barrels that give the spirit more intense contact with the wood than they'd get in full-size cooperage. O'Donnell operates two small stills in his corner of the Hillsboro warehouse he shares with Big Bottom Whiskey, using a squat pot still for whiskey and a column still to make brandy with fresh fruit available at the right price, a system that keeps him plenty busy and assures that every release is essentially a unique vintage. MARTIN CIZMAR.

Tastings & Tours:Tastings are free 12-4 pm Saturday, or by appointment, in the tasting room they share with Big Bottom.

Drink this: Aged Oregon Single Malt American Whiskey, which uses small 5-gallon barrels to quickly get a full oak flavor that would take years in a large barrel.

Vinn Distillery

833 SE Main St.,Suite 125, 807-3826, vinndistillery.com.

The founders of Vinn Distillery were once stuck at sea on a boat for 47 days off the coast of Hong Kong. They'd been deported from Vietnam for being ethnically Chinese, but could flee China because Phan Ly—the father of the family of seven—knew how to pilot a boat, eventually finding sanctuary in Wilsonville, after a church agreed to sponsor them. Ly had always made his baijiu for family and neighbors, a sweet-hot Chinese rice spirit that is one of the most-consumed liquors in the world but is made in America by only one distillery: Vinn. After running a host of Chinese restaurants, Phan Ly

didn't start the distillery until near the end of his life. "We asked my father why he started the distillery so late," says Michelle Ly, one of four children partnered in the business along with their mother, Kim Trinh, "and he said it was because the family never saw each other anymore." Well, their artisanal baijiu is a far cry from the improvised firewater often made in China: It's light, subtle and balanced, with cereal notes of rice grain still tangible, and their rice whiskey is beginning to mature into a lovely complexity, honed through multiple batches. MATTHEW KORFHAGE.

Tastings & Tours: From noon to 5 pm Saturday and Sunday, $5 will net you a tour through baijiu, whiskey, rice vodka and mijiu rice wines. A glutophobe's paradise. The distillery, in Wilsonville, is not open to the public.

Drink this: The baijiu ($35) is deservedly the flagship—and pairs well with any sort of citrus mixer that might otherwise ask for vodka.

Vinn Distillery (Daniel Cole)
Vinn Distillery (Daniel Cole)

Distillery Map

distillery-map

1. Big Bottom Whiskey

21420 NW Nicholas Court, Hillsboro, 608-7816, bigbottomwhiskey.com.

2. Bull Run Distilling Co.

2259 NW Quimby St., 224-3483, bullrundistillery.com.

3. Clear Creek Distillery

2389 NW Wilson St., 248-9470, clearcreekdistillery.com.

4. Dogwood Distilling

1835 19th Ave., Forest Grove, 359-7705.

5. Cornelius Pass Roadhouse Distillery

4045 NW Cornelius Pass Road, Hillsboro, 640-6174, mcmenamins.com.

6. Eastside Distilling

1512 SE 7th Ave., 926-7060, eastsidedistilling.com.

7. Edgefield Distillery

2126 SW Halsey St., Troutdale, 669-8610, mcmenamins.com.

8. Flooded Fox Den Distillery

2331 23rd Ave., Suite 103, Forest Grove, 308-9050, floodedfoxden.com.

9. House Spirits

2025 SE 7th Ave., 235-3174, housespirits.com.

10. Indio Spirits

7272 SW Durham Road, Suite 100, Tigard, 620-0313, indiospirits.com.

11. Rogue Distillery and Public House

1339 NW Flanders St., 222-5910, rogue.com.

12. New Deal Distillery

900 SE Salmon St., 234-2513, newdealdistillery.com.

13. Stone Barn Brandyworks

3315 SE 19th Ave., 775-6747, stonebarnbrandyworks.com.

14. Tualatin Valley Distilling

21420 NW Nicholas Court, Suites D-8 and D-9, Hillsboro, 949-212-6900, tvdistilling.com.

15. Vinn Distillery

833 SE Main St., Suite 125, 807-3826, vinndistillery.com.

16. Industrial Row Distillery

645 N Tillamook St., 893-4730, irdistillery.com.

17. Rolling River Spirits

1215 SE 8th Ave., Suite H, 236-3912, rollingriverspirits.com.

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Five Bottles to Try: Whiskey | Rum | Gin | Vodka | Fruit Liquors