It depended on a lot of variables—who was there, where they were. There was one time in 1993, in Eugene, at Autzen Stadium. They were coming up and playing the stadium every few years at that point. We were sitting in the back—in the way back, you couldn't get any further from the stage. The first set was fine, but then they started the second set with "Help on the Way/Slipknot/Franklin's Tower" and all hell broke loose. Everybody was standing up and screaming. It's one of those times when you see something that's improbable, unexpected and it blows you away. There are a lot of people who thought that was the greatest version of it that they ever did.

—Mike McMenamin, co-founder and owner of McMenamins

(Tricia Hipps)
(Tricia Hipps)

"Ripple"—it's a beautiful, simple tune, but also to me it has a message about our obligations to one another and how our good works have effects that reach far beyond the ones we help. My dad was an actual Deadhead. He got introduced to them in college when he was at UCLA. They would drive up to San Francisco for concerts. When I was a kid, I would go on trips with my dad and he would listen to his 8-tracks of the Grateful Dead, Elvin Bishop and various oldies, like The Big Bopper. But later, when I was in middle school or high school, he had me transfer his vinyls to tape, and I really listened to them then. He would have me repeat favorite songs with whatever tape was left, too, like "Sugar Magnolia."

—Nick Zukin, owner of Mi Mero Mole and local gadfly

My favorite song is "Eyes of the World." I love the jazzy vibe; it always gets me dancing. And even though the lyrics were written decades ago, I feel like the words are more important today than ever before. We are all truly the "Eyes of the World." We are exacting big changes by observing, posting and commenting through social media, something that didn't exist when the lyrics were written. While I find all the lyrics compelling, the line "Sometimes we live no particular way but our own" resonates very strongly with me.

—Lisa Morrison, owner of Belmont Station

(Tricia Hipps)
(Tricia Hipps)

This is a question I think about a lot that is both easy and difficult. Sort of a paradox, like the song "Terrapin Station" itself. Is it the end or the beginning? "Terrapin Station" has been my favorite song since the first time I heard it in 9th grade. All the beautiful imagery of turtles, crescent moons, spiral lights of Venus, strange shadows, crickets and cicadas singing; the introductory lyrics ("Let my inspiration flow") foreshadowing a story about a storyteller. Then you get Jerry Garcia singing about a storyteller's job being to shed light, not to master. Apropos lyrics if there ever were any. For me, songs don't get any better than this. A rare and different tune indeed! Look at these lyrics, I mean, c'mon! "Counting stars by candlelight/All are dim but one is bright:/The spiral light of Venus/Rising first and shining best/From the northwest corner/Of a brand-new crescent moon/Crickets and cicadas sing/A rare and different tune, Terrapin Station."

—Jordan Busch, co-owner of Fire on the Mountain

(Tricia Hipps)
(Tricia Hipps)

Favorite Dead song? "Eyes Of The World." Why? Because the song is about the power of us being the makers of the world we want to live in. To see the beauty in ourselves and to make with that beauty what we want in our world. We are at the control switch of our lives, and we need to walk with that knowledge. This song says it all. The struggle exists, but there's beauty in everything if we choose to find. Wake up to find out that you are the eyes of the world.

—Mimi German, activist suing Commissioner Chloe Eudaly to win access to public records on her private Facebook account

Thank you for contacting the Mayor's office. I spoke with the Mayor and he said "Box of Rain" is his favorite song from Grateful Dead.

—Trevaun Myrie, constituent service specialist, Office of Mayor Ted Wheeler

GO: Phil Lesh and the Terrapin Family Band play Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside, on Friday Feb 2 and Saturday Feb 3. 8 pm. Sold out. All ages.