People moving into a neighborhood tend to ask the same questions. Is it friendly? How are the schools? Is there much crime?

Upstream Research wants to help people add some new criteria: Will the local air hurt my health? How's the water? Can you get cancer here?

Upstream, a tech startup with offices in Bend and Bainbridge Island, Wash., has launched an app that compiles environmental health data from dozens of government databases, and allows customers to see the risks in their neighborhoods. The company has ambitions to become "the Carfax of real estate."

WW took the app for a spin—to see how Portland compares to similarly sized Western cities. The short answer? Not great.

We generated an Upstream report for Portland's Richmond neighborhood—aka the apartment canyon of inner Southeast Division Street—and compared it against trendy neighborhoods in Seattle, San Francisco and Las Vegas. Just like in the Upstream app, we graded the risk levels green (low), orange (moderate) and red (high). You can check your neighborhood at upstreamreports.com.

The results showed that ostensibly green Portland scores poorly compared to its neighbors in several categories—especially the release of air pollution and the locations of toxic soil. One silver lining: The risk of getting cancer from air pollution here is much lower than in the Emerald City. Suck it, Seattle!

Seattle
(Belltown neighborhood)

11 Carcinogen Airborne Release Points
112,800 pounds of pollution released, including nickel, chromium and benzene.

110 in a Million Risk of Cancer from Air Pollution
That's higher than 99 percent of American neighborhoods.

16th Percentile of Lead Exposure
This census tract has a higher lead-exposure risk than 15 percent of American neighborhoods.

23 Brownfields
The brownfield sites contaminate soil within 10 miles.

21% of Adults Drink Alcohol Excessively
Excessive drinking is more common here than in 92 percent of American counties.

Portland
(Richmond neighborhood)
31 Carcinogen Airborne Release Points

37,000 pounds of pollution released, including styrene, epichlorohydrin and formaldehyde.

59 in A Million Risk of Cancer From Air Pollution
That's higher than 95 percent of American neighborhoods.

89th Percentile of Lead Exposure
This census tract has a higher lead-exposure risk than 88 percent of American neighborhoods.

66 Brownfields
The brownfield sites contaminate soil within 10 miles.

24% of Adults Drink Alcohol Excessively
Excessive drinking is more common here than in 98 percent of American counties.

San Francisco
(Mission Dolores neighborhood)

0 Carcinogen Airborne Release Points
No pollution released.

71 in a Million Risk of Cancer from Air Pollution
That's higher than 98 percent of American neighborhoods.

88th Percentile of Lead Exposure
This census tract has a higher lead-exposure risk than 87 percent of American neighborhoods.

17 Brownfields
The brownfield sites contaminate soil within 10 miles.

20% of Adults Drink Alcohol Excessively
Excessive drinking is more common here than in 82 percent of American counties.

Las Vegas
(Fremont East neighborhood)

8 Carcinogen Airborne Release Points
2,500 pounds of pollution released, including styrene, benzene and polycyclic aromatic compounds.

71 in a Million Risk of Cancer from Air Pollution
That's higher than 98 percent of American neighborhoods.

66th Percentile of Lead Exposure
This census tract has a higher lead-exposure risk than 65 percent of American neighborhoods.

160 Brownfields
The brownfield sites contaminate soil within 10 miles.

17% of Adults Drink Alcohol Excessively

Excessive drinking is more common here than in 55 percent of American counties.

Sources: Upstream Research, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Toxic Releases Inventory, National Air Toxics Assessment, Centers for Disease Control