Mayor Ted Wheeler announced Monday afternoon that Danielle Outlaw, currently deputy police chief in Oakland, Calif., will be the next Portland police chief.

Wheeler chose Outlaw to replace Chief Mike Marshman, who held the position since June 2016. When she starts as chief—no later than Oct. 2—she will become the first black woman to serve as police chief in Portland history.

"I have concrete goals for the Portland Police Bureau, all of them challenging to achieve," Wheeler said in a statement on the decision. "I need a partner. I need a leader. More than that, I need someone with a passion for this work who will be in it for the long haul. Danielle Outlaw is that person."

Outlaw served in the Oakland Police Department for 19 years and was the second woman to rise to the level of deputy police chief in the agency.

"My life's passion is policing. I want to make a positive difference in the lives of my fellow officers and the residents of the community," Outlaw said in a statement. "Portland is an amazing city. I am humbled by the tremendous opportunity in front of me, and am ready to get to get to work."

The mayor's office deliberated over the choice for months, narrowing a field of finalists from six, to four, to one: Outlaw.

Initially, Wheeler said he would make the names of the finalists for the job public so that Portlanders could weigh in on the decision. But he ultimately kept two of the finalists under wraps because they asked for confidentiality during the hiring process.

Among Wheeler's options: keeping Marshman in his role, a move that would have prompted harsh criticism from left-leaning criminal justice reform advocates. Marshman's detractors say he shouldn't hold the position because of a domestic violence incident and because of the sometimes harsh police response to protests this year.

Marshman had strong support from rank-and-file officers and the Portland Police Association.

"Mike Marshman made tremendous strides in key areas during his time as Chief," Wheeler said. "I enjoyed a positive working relationship with him, and have the highest respect for him as a leader and as a person. He is a good man."

Marshman immediately released his own statement.

"I want to thank the members of the Portland Police Bureau for their support and the incredible work they do every day to keep Portland safe," Marshman said. "It has been an honor to serve as Chief of Police and to serve this community throughout my career. I'm confident that the Portland Police Bureau will continue to be a leader in 21st Century Policing and the community should rest easy knowing they have one of the best police departments in the country."

Update, 5:25 pm: Marshman will be retiring in the near future, and Assistant Chief Chris Uehara will take over as interim chief until Outlaw fills the position.

"I want to thank the members of the Portland Police Bureau for their support and the incredible work they do every day to keep Portland safe," Marshman said in a statement. "It has been an honor to serve as Chief of Police and to serve this community throughout my career. I'm confident that the Portland Police Bureau will continue to be a leader in 21st Century Policing and the community should rest easy knowing they have one of the best police departments in the country."

The police union president released a statement lamenting Marshman's departure.

"The rank and file members of the Portland Police Association are now and have always been the foundation of the PPB," said Daryl Turner, president of the Portland Police Association. "Although we will miss Chief Marshman's leadership, we will continue to move this organization in a positive direction as we serve the needs of our ever-evolving and diverse community with dedication, equity, and compassion."