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December 18th, 2013 WW Staff | Culture Features
 

Bring The Rain

Localish gear for the wet, cold days of December.

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Tags: rain gear
Men’s Gear

Bogs Carson boots

Available at bogsfootwear.com, Next Adventure and REI. $120.

Portland’s permapuddle demands a good pair of rubber boots, stylish enough to wear into a bar, without any mud-coated laces to fiddle with. For men, the Bogs Carson is the best you can do. This Portland-based bootmaker makes rugged footwear with chemical-proof polyurethane and steel shanks for farmers and firemen, but these city-grade slip-ons are perfect for biking, walking the dog or a Forest Park hike. The boots look like leather, but they’re perfectly sealed and easy to hose off. Wear without the arched insoles for a loose, natural fit.


Columbia Zonafied softshell jacket

Available at Columbia Sportswear, columbia.com, Nordstrom and REI. $180.

It’s amazing anyone in Portland owns an everyday jacket that’s not softshell. Sure, there will be two days a year when it’s raining hard enough to soak through the membrane—that’s what umbrellas are for. Meanwhile, it’s nice to have something soft against your skin that doesn’t rumple like tinfoil every time you raise your arm. And when it’s 40 degrees you need more insulation than the typical slicker provides. Columbia’s Zonafied softshell was clearly designed with locals in mind. It sheds drizzle, sprinkles and drops while the baffled insulation below the silver Omni-Heat lining makes you feel like a baked potato—in a good way.


Shedrain 2018 umbrella

Available at shedrain.com. $50.

There’s a certain class of Portlander who refuses the shelter of an umbrella, even in the most torrential of downpours. Such people are idiots. Fact is, some of the best umbrellas on the market are made by Northeast Portland’s Shedrain. This comfy but sturdy canopy has Teflon coating to send drops skidding off and a system of overhanging vents that allow big gusts of wind to float through without the umbrella popping inside out or rain leaking inside.


Filson Redwood II Anorak rain jacket

Available at Filson, 526 NW 13th Ave., 246-0900, and filson.com. $190.

Most rain jackets are like the tarps you tie between trees to keep your picnic from getting soaked: sheerly utilitarian devices. This handsome wax pullover is the glamping equivalent: stylish, with five front pockets and a sleek, casual design, but just as useful for shielding yourself from the elements.


Women’s Gear

Sorel Conquest Carly Glow boots

Available at sorel.com, Columbia Sportswear and Nordstrom. $130.

Made from vulcanized rubber—which means it’s both durable and elastic—and full-grain leather, these waterproof boots are a serious upgrade from those polka-dotted ones you bought at Target last winter. The brightly colored heel and side laces add a bit of flair without making things fussy.


Marmot ROM jacket

Available at marmot.com, REI, U.S. Outdoor Store and Next Adventure. $185.

ROM stands for “range of motion,” and you’ll indeed be able to move—and ride and hike and ski and climb—in this stretchy softshell jacket. It’s windproof, so it retains heat and is highly water-repellent (read: You won’t want to stand in an hours-long downpour, but you’re all set for months and months of drizzle).


Nau Intrenched raincoat

Available at nau.com, Lizard Lounge, Palace and Snow Peak. $295.

Local company Nau prides itself on using sustainable materials. Here, that means making old water bottles and textile waste into recycled polyester and turning the whole thing into a waterproof jacket. It’s a sleek trench coat with an asymmetrical design, but the sealed seams and longer cut mean you’ll still stay dry in a storm.


Bella Umbrella pagoda umbrella

Available at bellaumbrella.com. $129.

Pacific Northwesterners may bristle at the thought of carrying an umbrella, but Seattle company Bella Umbrella is working to change that. This curvy design harks back to the pagoda style popular in the ’30s and ’40s—except this umbrella won’t turn upside down in a windstorm.

 
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