1. Five & Dime

6535 SE Foster Road.

(Laurel Kadas)
(Laurel Kadas)

While you won't find shelves stocked with cheap talcum powder and undergarments, the new bar along the Foster-Powell corridor reflects the prices and spirit of a 20th-century trinket emporium. The room intermingles sophistication with subversion, mixing jade shelving stocked with leather-bound books with a neon ombré portrait of Rasheed Wallace, while the cocktails—some themed after the Neil Gaiman book American Gods—also balance tradition and irreverence.

2. The Vern

2622 SE Belmont St.

The latest preservation project from Warren Boothby and Marcus Archambeault is Hanigan's Tavern, way better known to Portland barflies as the Vern. Not only have they made the name official, the new owners installed relics from other bygone local dives—including the fire pit from Overlook Tavern—and, as they did with Sandy Hut, cleaned the joint up without scrubbing out its grimy essence.

3. Great Notion

2450 NW 28th Ave., 971-279-2183, greatnotionpdx.com.

(Laurel Kadas)
(Laurel Kadas)

The sister location to its tiny Northeast Alberta Street brewpub, Great Notion's newer, bigger space looks like a modern art museum from the outside. The shimmering wooden barroom is a beer-fueled echo chamber, and the beer is louder than the crowd. Bright purple sour ales, hazy yellow IPAs and jet-black imperial stouts flow from 24 taps, while massively decadent dessert stouts like Moon Pie assault the senses, fists finding all id and no ego.

4. Barbarella

125 NW 5th Ave., 503-208-2687.

(Christine Dong)
(Christine Dong)

Part of a chain of bars that first launched in Austin, Texas, a decade ago, Barbarella's aesthetic is as delightfully kitschy and low-budget as a bar named after a campy sci-fi cult classic should be. A dance club with dirt-cheap drinks and themed parties, the place should be a sensation, particularly with eastsiders who usually never dare venture into Old Town.

5. Studio One Theaters

3945 SE Powell Blvd., 971-271-8142, studioonetheaters.com.

(Magnus Holmes)
(Magnus Holmes)

The long-gestating passion project of Cinetopia founder Rudyard Coltman and his wife, Shelly, is a luxe cinema, bar and music venue, not necessarily in that order. Each screening room is a pretend penthouse themed after six of the planet's more enviable urban centers, and the restaurant space serves 50 wine varieties, local beers and bowls of a sublime gourmet popcorn.