According to the White House chef, Oregon wine is the choice libation to toast the over 200-year-old French and U.S. alliance.

Last Tuesday, at President Donald Trump's first state dinner with French President Emmanuel Macron and his wife, Brigitte, an Oregon Chardonnay and a Pinot Noir were two of three wine selections on the menu.

The wines, according to the New York Times, were picked because of their "healthy American-French" symbolism.

The Chardonnay—a Domaine Serene Evenstad Reserve 2015—uses grapes from French plants grown in the Willamette Valley. And the Pinot Noir—a Domaine Drouhin "Laurene" 2014—has the motto "French soul—Oregon soil," because the wine is fermented in French Oak barrels.

The vineyards are two of around 30 that crowd the small town of Dundee. 30 minutes southwest of Portland, the hamlet (population 3,000) is known chiefly for its production of Pinot Noir. 

In authentic French-American style, Domaine Drouhin Oregon is owned by the Drouhin family of Burgundy, France. Their wines are made by fourth generation winemaker, Veronique Boss Drouhin.

Domaine Serene's owners, Grace and Ken Evenstad, are former businesspeople originally from Minnesota who had "longtime dreams of growing and producing world class Pinot Noir." They also own vineyards in Burgundy, France.

Along with the wine, the three course meal included "spring lamb," jambalaya, goat cheese gateau and a nectarine tart. The spread is a notable upgrade from the "two Big Macs, two Fillet-O-Fish, and a chocolate malted" aides say Trump commonly orders from McDonalds.