Here Are our Favorite Bars Where You Can Sit and Stay for a Drink or Two With Fido

All of these patios are pet-friendly and feature plenty of heaters for winter.

A good dog bar needs to meet the needs of its canine and human patrons alike.

For the former, that means plenty of outdoor space, water bowls on deck, and staffers who love to fawn over their furry visitors. The latter needs good energy, delicious food, a wide beverage selection, and heaters (especially in winter, when the urge to hole up with your pup and drink at home is strong). These local favorites fit the bill.

DOWNTOWN

Momo’s

725 SW 10th Ave., 503-478-9600. 3 pm-2:30 am daily.

As one Momo’s staffer neatly articulated over the phone, “If your dog is friendly, we’re dog-friendly.” She may have been underselling the joint’s pet-loving panache, because on a recent Saturday afternoon, visitors were greeted by a giant poodle chilling on a chaise lounge near the entrance. Momo’s is best known for its arcade games, moody lighting and classic, red vinyl booths, but the patio is the real draw for dog lovers. The deck is spacious, broken up into elevated nooks, and covered in blessedly powerful heat lamps, making it a wintertime go-to for pet owners who can’t drink without their pooches. It’s the kind of place where an overzealous border collie can jump onto a picnic table and nobody will bat an eye.

NORTH PORTLAND

Prost!

4237 N Mississippi Ave., 503-954-2674, prostportland.com. 11 am-2:30 am daily.

Prost! is a Portland classic for a reason. There’s the triple-threat outdoor heating system: a fireplace, overhead lamps and tabletop space heaters. There’s the location—the patio opens up to a Mississippi food cart pod that includes Bloodbuzz, Fried Egg I’m in Love and White Elephant. Then there’s the outdoor bar, which is helpful for those anxious pups who want to keep an eye on their person while they order, and an owner-friendly pet station stocked with bowls and giant Igloo water coolers. It’s the perfect spot for anyone who wants to feel like a Bavarian tavern wench with their dog in tow. No judgment.

StormBreaker Brewing St. Johns

8409 N Lombard St., 971-255-1481, stormbreakerbrewing.com/st-johns. 11 am-9 pm Sunday-Monday, 11 am-10 pm Tuesday-Saturday.

If you’re sick of cooking under patio lamps that blast your face with direct heat, rejoice. StormBreaker’s outdoor space is enclosed by a screen, and heated gently and consistently by radiators mounted high along the wall. The result is pleasant—mild, even—and likely to lull your dog to sleep while sprawled across one of the picnic table’s wide, smooth benches. This spot is for pet owners who value classic pub grub, modern rock and a lengthy draft list. Private parties can also book an ax-throwing session, though you may want to leave the dogs at home for that one.

NORTHEAST PORTLAND

Hi-Top Tavern

5015 NE Fremont St., 503-206-4308, hitoptavern.com. 3-11 pm Monday-Friday, 2-11 pm Saturday-Sunday.

This infinitely Instagrammable cocktail bar boasts an outdoor patio entrance, which as any owner of an excitable pet knows comes in handy when you’re trying to keep your dog from lunging at other patrons. The atmosphere is laid back but elevated—the deck is adorned with string lights, speakers play a soothing soundtrack of R&B and plenty of outdoor space heaters keep things toasty. It all comes together to enhance an impressively lengthy food and cocktail menu that includes massive hand pies that will warm your bones in winter.

Mad Hanna

6127 NE Fremont St., 503-288-2944, madhanna.com. 11 am-2:30 am daily.

In case the giant mural of a dog hoisting a pint of beer on the side of its shed doesn’t tip you off, Mad Hanna is cool with canines. It’s not, however, cool with COVID-19, so the bartender checks vaccination cards upon entry. While the old-school dive’s mismatched furniture and signature pudding shots are what gets most of the attention here, the outdoor space is perfectly serviceable thanks to its patchwork of awnings and umbrellas to protect drinkers and their dogs from the elements. There’s a bowl of water already set out for Fido’s arrival, and one quiet corner with a fireplace and television for you.

NORTHWEST

Lucky Labrador Beer Hall

1945 NW Quimby St., 503-517-4352, luckylab.com. 4-9:30 pm Monday-Thursday, 2-10 pm Friday, noon-10 pm Saturday, noon-9 pm Sunday.

It’s right there in the name—the owners of Lucky Lab picked their mascot because they thought it was “the perfect symbol of what we were trying to accomplish: a friendly, faithful neighborhood pub.” The Slabtown location boasts a massive patio that’s half covered and basically looks like a dog park if the concrete slab were covered in grass. But if outer Northwest isn’t convenient to get to, Lucky Lab fortunately has locations with outdoor seating in every other quadrant.

SOUTHEAST

Barrio

7238 SE Foster Road, #9, 971-808-8212. 2-9 pm Monday-Thursday, noon-10 pm Friday-Sunday.

Barrio is part of the Portland Mercado, a collection of brightly painted food trucks, a market and a butcher. The indoor space is tiny, but the sprawling covered patio has picnic tables with plenty of space for your pup to hang out underfoot. It’s a popular pet-owner spot, and the bartenders love to come outside and dole out scratches. During December, Barrio also hosted a photos-with-Santa session for doggos instead of kids. If your fur baby happens to be a music lover, check the bar’s Facebook page before you go to coordinate your visit with its frequent live performances.

VANCOUVER

Trap Door Brewing

2315 Main St., Vancouver, Wash., 360-314-6966, trapdoorbrewing.com. 3-10 pm Monday-Wednesday, 11 am-11 pm Thursday-Saturday, 11 am-10 pm Sunday.

This spot requires a trip across the Columbia, but Trap Door offers an extensive menu of beer, cider and kombucha as well as a partially covered patio with cozy fire pits. There’s even a conveniently located food cart pod right next door. It’s a Vancouver gem and a pet haven—the business has an Instagram account, @dogsoftrapdoorbrewing, devoted solely to its canine customers.

See more of Willamette Week’s 2022 Pet Issue Here!

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