Last week, WW compared transaction data for Portland Lyft and Uber rides ("Lyfted," WW, Feb. 20, 2019). The results? Portland is the rare U.S. city where Lyft dominates Uber. The reason is unclear but could trace back to the #deleteUber campaign in 2017 and the bad press the company got for using a tool called Greyball to evade Portland regulators. Here's what readers had to share.

Greg Wilson, via Facebook: "We always go with whoever is cheapest. And Uber is always cheaper!"

Lizzie Johnson, via Facebook: "I always compare the prices between the two, and Lyft is always cheaper!"

Sharde Nabors, via Facebook: "I drive for Uber Eats but I ride exclusively with Lyft. *shrug*"

Gianna RM, via Facebook: "Because we vote with our wallets and prefer to hire companies that have better values than their competitors."

Matthew Groff, via Facebook: "As a driver, you can't make a living by only driving for one platform. Most passengers pick based on which driver is closer or which app is cheaper. You're lying if you say you're doing it based on philosophy or your loose understanding of which company is least unethical."

Amanda Estrada, via Facebook: "As an Uber and Lyft driver, I do way more rides with Uber than Lyft."

Kit Barnett, via Facebook: "Lyft. Uber's CEO is skeezy and they treat drivers like shit."

Jim Smith, via Facebook: "I've been driving for three years, and Uber is three times busier than Lyft. There is zero difference in operating policy toward drivers in the two companies."

Patrick Bright, via Facebook: "I drive for Lyft exclusively, but everyone calls my car an Uber. It doesn't bother me. It's kind of like how people call all facial tissues Kleenex."

Adrian Adel, via Facebook: "In my opinion, neither is better when it comes down to scandal."

Kristin Fulton, via Twitter: "Haven't taken an Uber in years."

Make America Godly Again, via Twitter: "I think Lyft drivers are friendlier."

Ian Strappini, via Facebook: "Barf, only real Portlanders take Radio Cab."

Corrections

A story about cormorant killings on East Sand Island in the Columbia River ("Fishing Expedition," WW, Feb. 6, 2019) incorrectly stated that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers detonated explosives to drive away the birds. In fact, it shot birds out of the sky, poured oil on their nests, stole their eggs, ran human patrols near their nests, and set up balloons and coyote and eagle effigies to scare them away.

Last week's cover story ("Portland at All Hours," WW, Feb. 20, 2019) incorrectly credited a photographer. The photos of Clan Macleay bagpipe practice were taken by Laurel Kadas.

WW regrets the errors.