The May 17, 2000, issue of Willamette Week included a brief note that the Portland Trail Blazers, after press deadlines, were expected to reach the NBA's Western Conference finals. They did.

They wouldn't do so again until this week. With Damian Lillard and CJ McCollum leading the Blazers against the defending champion Golden State Warriors, we looked back at what else was in our newspaper the last time this happened.

Here's what we found.

1. In the weeks after a May Day protest, where "black- masked marchers" squared off with officers on horseback, city leaders fought about how police handled the event. At the march, "police horses threw marchers back into a bus shelter and riot squads squared off against radical cheerleaders and drummers."

2. Mayor Vera Katz was at odds with city commissioners for at first praising and then chastising police officers' response to the protesters.

3. WW apologized for running a John Callahan cartoon that showed the pope singing Patti Smith lyrics that included a racial slur.

4. Portland's very first New Seasons Market had just opened. In a review, WW called it "the supermarket of your dreams," and pointed to shopping carts with cup holders for lattes as a sign the grocer "might be a little different."

5. City Commissioner Erik Sten marched with an anti-logging activist group called the Tree People.

6. TriMet lost some federal funding for its plan to build a MAX line into North Portland.

7. The Oregon Lottery forgot to reserve the domain name oregonlottery.com and was fighting a Portlander to get it.

8. Businesses were just beginning to migrate online, and a "dot-commer" wrote in a cover story about "the Web": "If it's a big scam, a smoke-and-mirrors show, at least we will be masters, not minions."

9. Ballots in the mayoral primary between Jake Oken-Berg and incumbent Vera Katz were counted on the same night as the Blazers playoff contest against the Utah Jazz. WW polled experts on outcomes. Everyone favored Katz and the Trail Blazers. Everyone won.

10. WW published a 127-page paper, with 24 pages of classified ads and five pages of personals.