Last night was Portland's 99th straight day of protest since the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis, and it played out like many of the others before it.

In North Portland, about 300 protesters marched from Kenton Park to the Portland Police Association offices on North Lombard Street. Around 11:30 pm, Portland police officers and Oregon state troopers, unnerved by a crowd that surged toward the union hall and loudly popped helium balloons, rushed into the throng and tackled protesters to the pavement. For two hours, officers repeatedly sprinted into the crowd for "targeted arrests" of protesters they alleged had committed crimes, including pointing lasers at police.

In all, 27 arrests were made.

One name on the list of arrestees, however, stands out: Loewy Malkovich, the son of actor John Malkovich.

Malkovich, 28, is accused of interfering with a peace officer and disorderly conduct in the second degree.

Both Loewy Malkovich and his sister, Amandine, attended Reed College. According to his LinkedIn profile, Loewy Malkovich currently works as a software engineer for a Colorado-based tech company.  (The Portland Police Bureau's press release lists Malkovich's age as 38, but records show he was born in March 1992 and lists a Southwest Portland address.)

Last month, Multnomah County District Attorney Mike Schmidt said his office would not prosecute protesters accused of low-level crimes, including those Malkovich was arrested for. But some of the Oregon State Police making arrests last night have been federally deputized, which means the protesters arrested could face federal charges.

Malkovich's involvement in the anti-police brutality protests is notable given his father's politics, which have leaned conservative: In the early 2000s, John Malkovich supported the Iraq War, and he recently criticized "cancel culture" while promoting his Netflix show Space Force, itself a satire of the space warfare branch of the military created by Donald Trump.

In a May interview with The Guardian, however, John Malkovich said he hadn't voted since the 1972 presidential election, in which supported Richard Nixon's Democratic challenger, George McGovern.

"I guess I think the system is pretty corrupt," he said.