In the last 10 days, an area larger than the state of Rhode Island has burned in Oregon.

The fires closest to Portland—the combination of the Riverside, Beachie Creek and Lionshead fires—spanned 56 miles and consumed nearly a half-million acres.

"We have not seen the likes of this fire, in this state, this integrated with our communities ever before," said Doug Grafe, Oregon Department of Forestry's chief of fire protection at a Sept. 11 press conference.

Oregon's fire troubles are worsening, the historical records show. On that, there's little debate, though the reasons will become points of contention as the state moves to grapple with what to do about them: climate change, forest management, building in the forest, even building codes.

The trend of fires burning more than 100,000 acres—so-called megafires—shows what this state has been up against. Their numbers are growing.

Megafires Since Sept. 8, 2020: 5

Fire | Acres

Beachie Creek | 188,374

Holiday Farm | 165,023

Lionshead | 168,097

Riverside | 134,575

Archie Creek | 121,379

Megafires in 2000-August 2020: 16

Year | Fire | Acres

2000 | Jackson | 108,000

2001 | Lakeview Complex  | 179,400

2002 | Toolbox Complex | 120,085

2002  | Biscuit | 500,000

2006 | South End Complex| 117,553

2007 | Egley Complex | 140,360

2011 | High Cascades Complex | 108,154

2012 | Miller Homestead |  160,853

2012 | Holloway | 245,308

2012 | Long Draw | 558,198

2014 | Buzzard Complex | 395,747

2015 | Cornet-Windy Ridge | 103,887

2015 | Canyon Creek Complex | 110,262

2017 | Chetco Bar | 191,125

2018 | Boxcar 0410 RN | 100,207

2018 | Klondike | 175,258

Megafires in the 20th Century: 6

Year | Fire | Acres

1902 | Columbia (aka the Yacolt Fire) | 170,000

1933 | Tillamook Burn | 240,000

1939 | 2nd Tillamook Burn | 217,000

1945 | 3rd Tillamook Burn  | 173,000

1996 | Ashwood/Donnybrook | 100,590

1996 | Simnasho | 118,000