They just don't make 'em like they used to. One glance at that Dover-white 1969 Chevy Camaro pace car with those sleek, Hugger-orange stripes running down the hood, and you'll agree. With power, speed and style, it is easy to see why these cars were used to pace the fields of Indy racing machines. It was designed for you and me. It was speed and power that we could drive down a highway. It was pure American muscle for the average driver.

Motorsports history is the study of human ingenuity, hard work and elbow grease. And World of Speed in Wilsonville has more than enough muscle cars, hot rods, funny cars and Indy® cars to prove it. This nonprofit motorsports museum prides itself on having something for everyone, from those who can recall every winner of the 500 to people who just want to see what pure speed on four wheels looks like.

World of Speed boasts one of the largest collections of historic Indy cars this side of Indianapolis, with its special "Heroes and History" exhibit celebrating the 100th running of the 500—including that dazzling '69 pace car. The 33 Indy cars on display are joined by exhibits such as the Daytona Display, Wall of Sound, Oregon Sidewinders motorcycles, three racecar simulators and much more.

Alongside these historic cars and racing artifacts created by engineers and drivers in the Pacific Northwest, World of Speed celebrates great NW Indy heroes. Drivers such as Len Sutton, Art Pollard as well as Portland's own constructor/owner Rolla Vollstedt. Rounding out the experience, World of Speed's Learning Center is filled with activities ranging from hands-on workshops, STEM-focused classes, camps to gallery talks, and lectures by world-famous racing icons.

World of Speed offers a comprehensive look at motorsports history for gearheads and newbies alike. It's a nostalgic trip through American automotive ingenuity. From the cars that sped down Indianapolis Motor Speedway® to that beautiful white-and-orange Camaro that set the pace, this museum is a thrill for everyone who has ever felt the need for speed.

For more information, visit www.worldofspeed.org.