FRIDAY, NOV. 20

April Black Designs
April Black Designs

[BUY PDX] CEID businesses like Bunk Bar, Cargo—which just celebrated one year back on the East side—and City Home pair up with local makers for a crafty tent city. It's like the dark sibling of Saturday Market. With better food: Boke Bowl, BUNK Sandwiches, Noraneko, Olympia Provisions, PDX Sliders, Roman Candle Baking Co.,Produce Row Cafe, Upper Left Roasters and Carmella's Wines. 110 SE Alder St., 4 pm-10 pm. Free.

The 3rd Floor XXXIII: The Final Chapter

The 3rd Floor
The 3rd Floor

Thirty-three shows and 20 years after it started as a group of recent college grads who thought that they were pretty funny, one of Portland's oldest comedy troupes is retiring. Boasting over 50 company members and alumni, the group promises even more for their farewell sketch comedy show at Milagro, notably beef ghosts (hamburgers?) and Tony Marcellino from Portland improv troupe the Liberators. Milagro Theatre, 525 SE Stark St., 236-7253. 8 pm. $16-$19.

[ARTHOUSE CINEMA] Opera Theater Oregon presents a restoration of the French romance The Umbrellas of Cherbourg, preceded by live French cabaret music. Clinton Street Theater, 2522 SE Clinton St., 7 pm. $10.

Low, Andy Shauf

[SLUMBER MILL] Typically classified by the oversimplified genre description "slowcore," indie trio Low has been crawling along for more than two decades with its idiosyncratic brand of folk. Its last LP featured production from Jeff Tweedy, and now Ones and Sixes gets help from former Wilco drummer Glenn Kotche. It was recorded at Bon Iver's rural Wisconsin studio, and the sound evokes images of the snowy plains of Eau Claire in the winter. It's got a dreary, freezing-cold feel—sometimes scary, and almost entirely beautiful. CRIS LANKENAU. Doug Fir Lounge, 830 E Burnside St. 9 pm. $20. 21+.

SATURDAY, NOV. 21

Double Dragon 4th Anniversary

Photo from Double Dragon
Photo from Double Dragon

[DRINK + EAT] Double Dragon—home to excellent banh mi and even better kimchi hot dogs—will turn 4 this Saturday. They're celebrating with $4 sammies, $4 daiquiris with 4-year rum and $4 Old Forester Birthday Bourbon. Sensing a theme? It's subtle. Double Dragon, 1235 SE Division St., 230-8340. 8 pm.

Youth Lagoon, Taylor McFerrin

[PSYCH POP] Trevor Powers' warbly bedroom symphonies can be thought of as the distant, more experimental and spaced-out cousin to fellow Boise natives Built to Spill. On his third LP, Savage Hills Ballroom, he shines under the polish of producer Ali Chant, and age has broadened his lyrical spotlight to include biography and societal malevolence. The broader, more textured pop template sets a gorgeous foundation for the ugly realities of toxic relationships, self-medication and death. CRIS LANKENAU. Doug Fir Lounge, 830 E Burnside St. 9 pm. $20 advance, $23 day of show. 21+.

(Illustration by Rick Vodicka)
(Illustration by Rick Vodicka)

[WEIRD BURLESQUE] Weird Al Yankovic-inspired burlesque, Al-Stravaganza!, comes to the Funhouse Lounge. What will it include? More importantly, what should it include? Here are three sexy Weird Al numbers we want to see: "Key Party in the CIA" Based on: "Party in the CIA," based on "Party in the USA" by Miley Cyrus. Hot CIA agents swap wives while they destabilize countries. Includes fun waterboarding play. "Amish Bonnet-Fetish Paradise" Based on: "Amish Paradise," based on "Gangsta's Paradise" by Coolio, based on "Pastime Paradise" by Stevie Wonder. What's under Al's beard? Find out in this candlelit buttonless striptease. Tonight we're gonna party like it's 1669. "Beat It" Based on: "Eat It," based on "Beat It" by Michael Jackson. Works either way. Funhouse Lounge, 2432 SE 11th Ave., 841-6734. 9 pm. $15-$20.

photo from Savory Events
photo from Savory Events

[EDM + BACON] Combining two of the most indulgent, dripping and pungent fads to reign alt-culture, EDM and bacon, Savory Events throws their fourth "hamcoming" extravaganza. It started in 2013 as an after party where someone started cooking bacon. Now it bigger, if not more savory, including aerial dancers and nearly a dozen DJs, but there is still bacon. AudioCinema LLC, 226 SE Madison St., 9 pm. $10.

B.I.B. 999

[FINE-TIPPED ART] Toronto-based graphic artist Allister Lee sketched 999 black markers—a glass-barrel Magic Marker, a plastic Crayola jumbo grip and a classic Sharpie—and titled it B.I.B. (Black is Beautiful). It may not be obvious at first why you'd want to see 999 black markers at a gallery, but when you see it for yourself—it's worth it. Through Nov. 30. One Grand Gallery, 1000 SE Burnside St., 212-365-4945.

The Devil and Billy Markham

[THEATER] Shel Silverstein's six-part, epic poem about the unshakable Billy Markham and how he took a bet for his life debuted in Playboy in 1979. Starting on Nashville's Music Row (where else?) Billy takes a Beckett-esque romp through Hell and back, encountering God and the Devil along the way. Artists Rep's reprisal of the wry one-act will follow performances of Broomstick and share the same, spooky set. Artists Repertory Theatre, 1515 SW Morrison St., 241-1278. 9:30 pm Thursday-Saturday, Nov. 19-21. $20.

Image Comics

[BOOKS] Image Comics was founded in 1992 with the revolutionary idea that maybe it was good to let writers and artists own the characters they created. In that time, it's spawned titles such as Spawn, The Walking Dead and Witchblade. It brings together four stars: Kelly Sue DeConnick, writer of Bitch Planet; Kurt Busiek writer of Astro City; and Joe Keatinge, editor of the PopGun anthology and writer of Shutter and the forthcoming Ringside. Powell's City of Books, 1005 W Burnside St., 228-4651. 4 pm. Free.

The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 2

(Illustration by Elise Elgert)
(Illustration by Elise Elgert)

[JENNIFER LAWRENCE] Did you miss the first 2.5 Hunger Games because you weren't into movies about kids murdering each other? Here are literally all the facts you need to know to seem like an aloof expert without losing six hours of your life. The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 2 is rated PG-13. It opens Friday at most Portland-area theaters.

SUNDAY, NOV. 22

Sci-Fi Authorfest 9

[BOOKS] This huge gathering of sci-fi authors will include Brent Weeks (Lightbringer series), Hugo winner Kristine Kathryn Rusch, and Annie Bellet, who withdrew from Hugo consideration during the Sad Puppy mess. Powell's Books at Cedar Hills Crossing, 3415 SW Cedar Hills Blvd., 228-4651. 4 pm. Free.

Photo from Frances May’s Fall Editorial
Photo from Frances May’s Fall Editorial

[BUY PDX] Frances May is a city favorite for sweet women's designs (they do have menswear and jewelry too), and once a year their pop-up sells them for 75-90% off. Cash and card accepted, elbowing discouraged. The Cleaners at Ace Hotel, 403 SW 10th Ave., 12 pm-4 pm. Free.

Mozart's Piano Concerto No. 27

[CLASSICAL] No one knows if Mozart ever performed his final piano concerto live. In fact, there's not even agreement on whether he wrote it in 1788 or 1791, the year of his death. But being such a late piece in his career, it is both expansive and experimental for its time—three movements that unusually employ multiple cadenzas. Guest conductor Stanislaw Skrowaczewski is, at 91, the oldest working major conductor in the world. Tonight, he will lead the symphony with a dark and dramatic mid-20th-century orchestral concerto by Lutoslawski. This bombastic, percussion-heavy work will more than offset the traditional and baroque Brahms bit at night's end. NATHAN CARSON. Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, 1037 SW Broadway, 7:30 pm Sunday, Nov. 22. $29-$105. All ages.

(Photo by Moses Gunesch)
(Photo by Moses Gunesch)

[THEATER] What's coming—sexist vitriol? Dead baby jokes? Two hours of blackfacing? In Liminal Performance Group's adaptation of this seminal anti-play—written in 1966 by Austrian dramatist Peter Handke, when he was 23 years old with a Beatles coif and round sunglasses—the actors do remarkably little offending. On opening night, the audience members did a whole lot more to offend one another, including texting, singing, snapping selfies, talking back to performers and loudly departing for the restroom. I'm not sure Liminal's version is entirely successful—Handke was once an enfant terrible of the literary world, but his smashing of the fourth wall and junking of plot and character doesn't feel so revolutionary in 2015. Even those who enjoy theater about theater will roll their eyes and check their watches at times. But it's still a welcome alternative to innocuous crowd-pleasers. Video cameras transmit live black-and-white footage onto one wall. Another wall shows a live text-message feed—we're given a phone number, and the result is a stream of Beyoncé GIFs and boner jokes. It's clear: We are the performers. There is no show without us. REBECCA JACOBSON. Action/Adventure Theatre, 1050 SE Clinton St., 567-8309. 7:30 pm Friday-Sunday and 2:30 pm Sunday. Through Nov. 22. $10-$25.