FRIDAY, OCT. 14

Black Girl: A Linguistic Play

(Christopher Duggan)
(Christopher Duggan)

Choreographer Camille A. Brown's latest work is not meant to be political. It's about her and her childhood, but oddly enough, that's political. As a black woman, it ends up being a statement about representation presented in an overly white city. Her company has gained a national reputation for its award-winning storytelling abilities. Black Girl: A Linguistic Play uses movements inspired by childhood games: double dutch, drawing with chalk, basketball footwork and hand-clapping games. Newmark Theatre, 1111 SW Broadway, whitebird.org. 7:30 pm Thursday-Saturday, Oct. 13-15. $26-$68.

Fresh Hop Fest

Thought you'd seen your last kick-ass fresh hop fest? Wrong, motherfucker! There's this one. Tin Buckety's tapping all three Breakside fresh hops, plus Culmination, a Crux, Ecliptic Flat Tail, Two Towns, and Machine House. Frershness is dead. Long live freshness. Tin Bucket, 3520 N Williams Ave., 5 pm, Free. 21+.

The Lost Boys Live

Before Edward Cullen, the pubescent boy vampires of The Lost Boys combined blood lust with coifed 80's hair. This live parody from improv genius Shelley McLendon and former LiveWire producer Courtenay Hameister promises more pleasure than pain. The Siren Theater, 315 NW Davis St., 8 pm, $25.

The Pillars of Portland

Last year, we brought 1983's Pillars of Portland, a regional soap opera based on a WW column, to the Clinton Street Theater for the first time since its original airing. The Northwest Film Center beings it back. Director Tom Chamberlain and member's of POP's crew will be in attendance. Northwest Film Center's Whitsell Auditorium 1219 SW Park Ave., 9 pm, $9.

Trans & Queer Hip Hop Party

(photo from Cake Facebook)
(photo from Cake Facebook)

Creepy clowns got you down? Sweat it out at the Cake dance party, while DJs spin hip hop, rap, r&b and the throwbacks. LGBTQ-inclusive, body positive, anti-racist and costumes encouraged—just maybe not clown costumes. Killingsworth Dynasty, 832 N Killingsworth St., 9 pm. $5.

Trinity of Soul

For the past 15 years, Fridays at the Goodfoot have been Soul Stew time, a sweaty basement dance party to MJ and more. But they've never done a three-part tribute to the three matriarchs of soul before. Dance to the trinity of Tina Turner, Aretha Franklin and Etta James, with iconic hits and obscure finds from DJ Aquaman and friends. The Goodfoot, 2845 SE Stark St., 9 pm, $5.

SATURDAY, OCT. 15

Bryan Cranston with Kristi Turnquist

Bryan Cranston was a middle-aged character actor who had risen up through the ranks on soap operas, commercials, a small role on Seinfeld and then as the dad on Malcolm in the Middle. Then came the role of a lifetime playing Walter White, the ruthless meth lord of AMC's landmark prestige drama Breaking Bad. In Cranston's new memoir A Life in Parts, the actor shares his history as the son of an actor who abandoned him, and learning the Hollywood business for himself. Cranston will be joined by The Oregonian media writer Kristi Turnquist. Powell's Books at Cedar Hills Crossing, 3415 SW Cedar Hills Blvd., 3 pm. Free.

My Own Private Idaho 25th Anniversary Screening

(Caitlin Degnon)
(Caitlin Degnon)

In 1991, Gus Van Sant’s My Own Private Idaho painted a bleak picture of a Portland of street prostitutes and violence. This weekend, NW Film Center screens My Own Private Idaho to celebrate the film’s 25th anniversary. To help get you in the mood, WW has created a handy walking tour of select Portland locations featured in the film, guiding you through Mike (River Phoenix) and Scott’s (Keanu Reeves) journey to find Mike’s mother. Map of Italy not included. NW Film Center’s Whitsell Auditorium, 1219 SW Park Ave., 7 pm, $9.

National Hip-Hop Day

City Hall is taking over the streets of downtown with a family-friendly homage hip-hop. Mic Crenshaw headlines, plus a tribute to the "Golden Era of Portland Hip Hop," live graffiti and B Boy performances. Sample southern fare and Stoopid Burgers before heading to the after-party, a screening of Beat Street at the Skype Live studio downtown. Portland City Hall, 1221 SW 4th Ave., 3 pm, after party at 8 pm. Free.

The North Portland Unknown Film Fest

(Don’t Kill Grandpa by Kelly Hughes)
(Don’t Kill Grandpa by Kelly Hughes)

You know when you end up in that dark corner of YouTube wandering aimlessly? For the second year in a row, this Fest curates obscure punk, grunge, lo-fi and folk films into a 3-part event. The afternoon session has shorts like an avant-garde dance film from Portland and a 30-minute French thriller. Stay for the 2-minute FilmFest at 5:30 pm, or just come for the evening session, which includes a short titled Don't Kill Grandpa Until We Strangle the Babysitter. Disjecta, 8371 N Interstate Ave., 2 pm, $5-$15.

The Portland Beer Pro-Am

(Christine Dong)
(Christine Dong)

For the fourth year, 30 pro brewers including Breakside, Fat heads and Great Notion team up with homebrewers to create some seriously ambitious one-off beers like a brett Burton Old Ale, a jalapeno cream ale, and…CBD-infused beer. It's our favorite time of year. The North Warehouse, Noon-6:30 pm. $25. Tix at wweek.com/beerproam.

Spiritual Pop

(crazy enough – photo from PAM)
(crazy enough – photo from PAM)

Sister Corita Kent was an artist, an activist, and a nun. This chronological retrospective of her work allows the viewer to track the progression of her colorful screenprints, from ornate, overtly religious works on paper to abstract pop-y compositions that marry secular writing with imagery from advertising and corporate propaganda. What is most notable about Kent's work is that regardless of its changing styles and cultural influences, she manages to infuse every piece with messages of love, peace, and fellowship that speak to the best in all of us. Portland Art Museum, 1219 SW Park Ave., 503-226-2811. Through Jan. 27.

Trillblazin x Index Trail Blazers Season Kickoff Party

(photo from Trailblazing)
(photo from Trailblazing)

Kick off the Blazers' 2016-17 season—and the 40th anniversary of the Blazers' so far lone championship—at Old Town rare sneaker den Index. There will be free drinks from sneakerhead coffee spot Deadstock and Montucky, giveaways and live music. I wouldn't be surprised if some Blazers showed up, either. INDEXPDX, 114 NW 3rd Ave, 7 pm.

SUNDAY, OCT. 16

Bill Plympton and his Plymptoons

(From Plympton’s “Your Face”)
(From Plympton’s “Your Face”)

The Oscar-nominated Portland animator will introduce his new short film and everyone gets an original Plymptoon sketch with admission. 8 pm, Mission Theater, 1624 NW Glisan St. $10. Minors with guardian.

Cathi Hanauer with Karen Karbo

When The Bitch in the House was first released in 2003, the fiery essays of the 26 contributors showed how co-parenting was bullshit, men are remoras, and people need to shut up about women's weights. All valid points. Now, maybe the nine returning contributors (and 16 new contributors) in The Bitch is Back have gained perspective with age, or maybe society has changed. No, it's probably not that. Editor Cathi Hanauer will talk about the new book with Karen Karbo, author of Motherhood Made a Man Out of Me. Powell's City of Books, 1005 W Burnside St., 7:30 pm. Free.

The Drowning Girls

(Casey Campbell Photography)
(Casey Campbell Photography)

Women aren't the only gender with enough ingenuity to kill their spouses for their money. Between 1912 and 1914, George Joseph Smith made a habit of it. He killed each of his three wives by drowning them in a bathtub, chalked up the murders to accidents caused by seizures, and claimed life insurance money and their estate afterwards. Drowning Girls resurrects those three women: they tell their stories as they stand in the bathtubs where their mutual husband murdered them. But the real villain here? The patriarchy. The play uses the draw of turn-of-the-century serial killers to critique the institution of marriage. The Venetian Theatre, 253 E Main St., Hillsboro, bagnbaggage.org. 2 pm. $20-$30.

Explode Into Colors

IMAGE: Megan Holmes.
IMAGE: Megan Holmes.

Back when the prevailing image of the Portland music scene was a bunch of sad dudes crying into their banjos, three women playing dubbed-out funk-punk took the city's basements by storm—then promptly broke up. Six years later, they're getting back together to support all-ages music. Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi Ave., (503) 288-3895. 6 and 9 pm. See mississippistudios.com for ticket prices. Early show all ages, late show 21+.

Reva Devito

(Reva Devito)
(Reva Devito)

Devoto's soulful tracks are the slow-swaying soundtrack to a Sunday night. She's dropping her latest video, for the Birthday Boy-produced track Deeper from her newest EP, with a chill party at Century. Expect muted, sultry beats like Rihanna at her softest heard through a pastel Instagram filter. DJ Deena Bee will spin until you have to go home and face the Monday looming. Century, 930 SE Sandy Blvd., 8:30 pm. Free.