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Now That We’ve Turned the Page on 2020, Here’s What Portland Cannabis Professionals Hope Happens Next

My New Year’s resolution: Ease off the autopilot and pay more attention to what you’re doing, stoner.

On the last day of 2020, I bought a 10-pack of joints, slipped them into my jacket pocket and forgot about them. Later that evening, I threw said jacket in the washing machine with the rest of the laundry. The weed had clogged my dryer's lint trap by the time I'd realized what happened, and all the laundry smelled like skunk.

My New Year's resolution was made then: Ease off the autopilot and pay more attention to what you're doing, stoner.

My resolutions are always broad and simple, so my success rate is relatively high. When self-care is just part of your everyday life, it's never a make-or-break scenario, just a small gift you give yourself.

But that's just one professional stoner's opinion. WW reached out to a handful of 2020's distinguished cannabis professionals to get their resolutions for 2021, in and out of the industry.

Hammond Potter, founder of Pot Mates Cannabis Delivery 

"My New Year's resolution is to be more involved in the fight for social equity within the cannabis industry. Whether that's mentoring or helping bring awareness to the issue, I want to help right the wrongs brought about by the War on Drugs and give people of color the confidence and knowledge they need to get into this industry."

Liv Vasquez, cannabis chef and educator

"I think this year we all were reminded that cannabis is health care, life is precious, and that we have a lot of heroes in our lives. My focus has switched from business to staying mentally and physically healthy in 2020, and honestly I'd like to keep that going into the next year."

Megon Dee, founder of Oracle Infused Wellness Co.

"My plan is to simply keep it pushing. 2020 taught me that not having expectations is literal freedom—accept everything for what it is and nothing less. This will eliminate the opportunity for disappointment. Growth comes naturally with time, so I look forward to expanding Oracle Wellness Co. and continuing to thrive in my purpose of helping others through plant medicine."

Jesce Horton, founder of LOWD Cannabis

"The industry should resolve to keep environmental sustainability and social justice as cornerstone principles of cannabis legalization."

Kim Lundin, executive director of the Oregon Cannabis Association

"Personally, I'm going to cherish every second I get to spend with my incredible fiancé, which means much better work boundaries. Professionally, I'm focusing on the power of a unified voice. We're part of a coalition effort to pass the Oregon Cannabis Equity Act, which focuses on reinvestment in the communities most harmed by the War on Drugs. It's a big lift, and we'll only succeed by bringing all stakeholders together, presenting a united voice, and demanding change."

Cambria Benson Noecker, founder of Serra

"I'm the person whose mind runs a million miles an hour in all directions and I'm constantly multitasking. I'm setting the intention to be more present and mindful in order to make the moments I have more impactful. I want to slow down, listen more and savor the fleeting moments. Also, act with more kindness, learn something new every day, waste less, exercise more—and put down the ice cream after the edibles!"

Carrie Solomon, founder of Leif Goods

"Stop burning garlic when I cook, which means be more patient. Eat bananas before they get overripe, which translates to be more disciplined. And take walks, which for me means stop looking at screens and connect more with my body and start taking control, damn it!"