Makeshifter's Snackhole Stem Bag, $75

Recommended by: Leah Benson, Gladys Bikes.

"It's basically the Mary Poppins of bike bags. It may look small, but after extensive testing, we've found that it can fit: a personal size bag of Fritos, two cans of La Croix, a smartphone, a water bottle, a tire patch kit, a Mason jar full of flowers, one dozen doughnut holes and lots of beef jerky. Not necessarily all at the same time. Also, it doesn't hurt that Makeshifter is a great one-woman bag company that's based in Portland."

Mission Workshop's The Mission Jean, $285

Recommended by: Mark Ontiveros, West End Bikes.

"It's a smart-looking, water-resistant jean that comes in a slim cut or a straight cut, navy blue or black. It's a dressy jean. You look good when you're off the bike, too. I don't really like rain pants, because that's one extra pant you have to deal with. If I could have one pant to wear when it's raining out, I can wear it all day, and that's one less thing I have to take. Less is more. It's one of the ultimate commuter jeans. No one would know it was a bike jean."

Recommended by: Brendan Ault, 21st Avenue Bicycles.

"It's a stainless-steel bottle cage made by one guy, here in the U.S., in Colorado. I think they're the best bottle cages in the world, and I totally swear by them. They're super-strong. Since they're stainless steel, they don't mark up your bottles. So you can have different colors, and words, the whole thing, and they don't get that black grime on them. And they hold the bottle super-securely. They make a couple different models. The Iris is one of them. You can put your thermos in it, or a tumbler and carry your coffee. It's really versatile."

Recommended by: Dan Houghton, Southwest Bicycle.

"It offers excellent grip even when wet. It has more cushion to damp vibration on rough roads and is very durable. It's three times more money than the cheap stuff but also lasts three times longer, so really it costs about the same or even less if you are paying someone to wrap your bars for you."


Sinewave Cycles' Beacon Dynamo Light, $350

Recommended by: Joe Doebele, Joe Bike

"It's the best-performing dynamo light on the market. It's brighter than the rest, and it produces light at lower speeds than the competition. It also has a USB port so you can charge your phone by pedaling. Dynamo lighting and charging systems are among our specialties, so when a clearly better light comes out, we want people to know. I also like that it's made in the U.S. and that the whole company is—as far as I know—basically one talented guy who is out-engineering established German and Japanese companies."

Recommended by: Jay Bender, River City Bikes

"Bike theft is ridiculously bad here in Portland. This lock is lightweight, compact, and you know your bike will be there when you get back."

PDW Pathfinder, $35

Recommended by: Corey Cartwright, Seven Corners Cycles.

"It's a rechargeable headlight that's nice and bright. It has a vertical cut-off beam, which is pretty dope, so it uses light from the main beam to focus down the road. It doesn't just use this unfocused light shining into other riders' eyes. When someone's riding toward you, you're not blinding them, but you can still see in front of you. And they're made here in Portland, right
up the street from us."

Recommended by: Rachel Monahan, WW Staff Writer.

"I first spotted the jacket glowing white in the dark of a bike lane last fall. Since I bought my own, I've received repeated requests from random strangers and friends alike for how to find the jacket themselves. It's made from a material that's 100 percent reflective; very small glass beads get the job done, according to the company. For those looking for a cheaper option, Proviz makes a backpack cover from the same material. The prospect of a jacket that would be unmissable to cars behind me helped give me the confidence to return to bike commuting this winter after more than a decade's pause."